How should I do the hip-tubes exercise?

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Exercise with tubing provides many benefits. Exercise tubing is lightweight, portable and comes in several resistance levels.  One exercise band can be used many ways to strength multiple body parts. There are many exercises you can perform with tubing to target the hip musculature. One such exercise is lateral tube walking. To perform this, wrap  tubing around the bottom part of your lower leg. Spread your feet slightly so there is tension on the tubing, and squat down slightly so your knees are slightly bent. Next, take a big step to the side, keeping your hips level to the ground. Follow this with a small step in (with the opposite foot). You’re now walking to the side, in semi-squatted position. Perform the desired amount of repetitions, and then switch directions to and repeat.

Rick Olderman
Physical Therapy

If you have difficulty balancing, begin hip tubes exercise without an exercise tube and lightly hold on to a stable surface for assistance. Stand and place an exercise tube or stretch band under both feet where your heels meet the arches of your feet. Raise the handles by bending your elbows. Raise your right foot off the floor approximately 1/2 inch. Slightly rotate your right knee outward while maintaining a square (neutral) pelvis and facing forward. Soften the left knee and be sure you are bearing weight through the arch of your left foot.

While keeping your right foot lifted 1/2 inch from the floor, move it out to the side and then back in (4-12 inches). Make the movement smooth and slow while maintaining your square pelvis, soft left knee, and bearing your weight through the left arch; maintain a tall spine without leaning. Perform 15 repetitions without allowing the right foot to touch the floor. Switch legs. Repeat 3 times on each leg.

Fixing You: Hip & Knee Pain: Self-treatment for IT band friction, arthritis, groin pain, bursitis, knee pain, PFS, AKPS, and other diagnoses

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Fixing You: Hip & Knee Pain: Self-treatment for IT band friction, arthritis, groin pain, bursitis, knee pain, PFS, AKPS, and other diagnoses

Hip and knee pain are often a result of poor pelvic muscle performance in combination with poor walking habits. This combination creates tracking problems in the hip socket or excessive rotation at...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.