Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. However, if you manage your condition effectively, you can expect a long, healthy life. Type 2 diabetes is treated with a combination of diet, exercise, and regular blood glucose, or blood sugar, testing.

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  • 2 Answers
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    There are a host of oral medications available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Almost everyone is put on metformin as long as their kidneys aren't already damaged. Metformin works by decreasing liver glucose production, decreasing glucose absorption in the gut and increasing peripheral insulin sensitivity. If someone has particularly resistant type 2 diabetes, insulin can be used.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Recommendations for healthy living can help anyone on a diabetes-treatment plan. Regardless of the medications you are using to control your glucose levels, blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides, make sure you eat healthy, maintain a healthy weight, and stay physically active. A study from the Diabetes Prevention Program found that people at risk for Type 2 diabetes who lost about 10 to 20 pounds and were active for 30 minutes a day, five days a seek, could prevent or delay the development of this condition.
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    A answered

    Many people with type 2 diabetes, especially those in the early stages, can manage their blood sugar effectively through diet, weight loss, and physical activity. But if diet and exercise alone are not adequately controlling your blood sugar, medications or insulin therapy may be able to help.

    Insulin therapy is used when prescription medications and healthy habits are not sufficiently controlling blood sugar levels, which usually occurs when your pancreas has stopped producing insulin or as a result of a serious infection or other illness. There are several different types of insulin that may be used either individually or in combination.

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    Adding an extra workout a week may be enough to counteract the fact that you’re not losing as much glucose in your urine anymore. If you are just learning to treat low blood glucose levels, you’ll want to make sure you’re not adding more calories than you need when you have a reaction. Eating 15 grams of carbohydrate is usually enough. If you’re still low after 10-15 minutes, repeat your treatment and test again.
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    A Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, answered on behalf of
    Diabetes is progressive, even with treatment. It's not uncommon for people with type II diabetes to require increasing amounts of medication to keep their diabetes under control as the years go by. The most important thing is not how much medication it takes to control your diabetes, but how well you keep your diabetes under control to prevent complications.
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    A Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, answered on behalf of
    What are the drug therapies used in type 2 diabetes treatment?

    Metformin is the most commonly used drug to treat type 2 diabetes. In this video, Ronald Tamler, MD, clinical director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center, talks about common drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes.


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin
    Insulin may not be able to attach to the muscle cells the way it is supposed to in people with type 2 diabetes. Watch the video to learn more about insulin problems in type 2 diabetes



  • 1 Answer
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    If you seek to intensively manage your type 2 diabetes, keep the following suggestions in mind:

    • If you manage your blood glucose with food and physical activity, you may
      need to add an oral diabetes medication.

    •If you already take medication, you may need to add another pill, once-a-day
      insulin, or other inject able medication.

    • If you already take insulin, you may need to take a more aggressive
      approach such as three or four shots a day. Your therapy might even be
      similar to a person with type 1 diabetes.

    • You may choose to wear an insulin pump if you begin taking more frequent
      insulin shots.

    • Watch out for weight gain that accompanies lowered blood glucose levels.
      You may need to add an extra workout a week to counteract the fact that
      you’re not losing as much glucose in your urine anymore.

  • 7 Answers
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    Whether you should take oral medication, insulin, or any medication at all and what sort of insulin or medication plan you need depends on how your body is dealing with the glucose it makes. Your treatment plan is based on your usual blood glucose levels. Ideally, you will want to keep your glucose levels as close to normal as possible. ADA’s general targets for blood glucose levels are 70–130 mg/dl range before meals and less than 180 mg/dl 2 hours after meals. Talk to your provider about setting your own blood glucose targets.

    Your treatment plan is based on your usual blood glucose levels. Ideally, you will want to keep your levels as close to normal as possible.

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    Cognitive behavior therapy may reduce depression and improve blood sugar level control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therapy may be less effective in people with diabetes complications or poorly controlled blood sugar levels. More studies are needed to make definitive recommendations.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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