Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. However, if you manage your condition effectively, you can expect a long, healthy life. Type 2 diabetes is treated with a combination of diet, exercise, and regular blood glucose, or blood sugar, testing.

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  • 2 Answers
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    There are a host of oral medications available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Almost everyone is put on metformin as long as their kidneys aren't already damaged. Metformin works by decreasing liver glucose production, decreasing glucose absorption in the gut and increasing peripheral insulin sensitivity. If someone has particularly resistant type 2 diabetes, insulin can be used.
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  • 1 Answer
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    The two goals of type 2 diabetes treatment are to make sure you feel well day-to-day and to prevent or delay long-term health problems, also called complications. The best way to reach those goals is by:

    - planning your meals -- choosing what, how much, and when to eat
    - being physically active
    - taking medications (if needed)

    For example, it can be difficult to lose weight by only cutting back on the amount of food you eat. But getting regular physical activity and cutting back on food will more likely result in weight loss.
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    There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. However, you can significantly lower the risk for type 2 diabetes and even prevent this condition with lifestyle changes such as proper diet and regular exercise. Some drugs may also help lower your risk of developing diabetes. Research studies and clinical trials are underway to help determine the causes of type 2 diabetes and how this condition can be prevented.

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    Cognitive behavior therapy may reduce depression and improve blood sugar level control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therapy may be less effective in people with diabetes complications or poorly controlled blood sugar levels. More studies are needed to make definitive recommendations.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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  • 7 Answers
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    Whether you should take oral medication, insulin, or any medication at all and what sort of insulin or medication plan you need depends on how your body is dealing with the glucose it makes. Your treatment plan is based on your usual blood glucose levels. Ideally, you will want to keep your glucose levels as close to normal as possible. ADA’s general targets for blood glucose levels are 70–130 mg/dl range before meals and less than 180 mg/dl 2 hours after meals. Talk to your provider about setting your own blood glucose targets.

    Your treatment plan is based on your usual blood glucose levels. Ideally, you will want to keep your levels as close to normal as possible.

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  • 1 Answer
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    Type 2 diabetes drugs that have been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes at high risk include empagliflozin and liraglutide. The results of a trial of the type 2 diabetes drugs empagliflozin and liraglutide unexpectedly demonstrated beneficial cardiovascular effects in people with type 2 diabetes who had high pre-existing cardiovascular risk.

    The importance of these findings is that specific glucose-lowering therapies have been found to reduce cardiovascular disease in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes. 
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    If you seek to intensively manage your type 2 diabetes, keep the following suggestions in mind:

    • If you manage your blood glucose with food and physical activity, you may
      need to add an oral diabetes medication.

    •If you already take medication, you may need to add another pill, once-a-day
      insulin, or other inject able medication.

    • If you already take insulin, you may need to take a more aggressive
      approach such as three or four shots a day. Your therapy might even be
      similar to a person with type 1 diabetes.

    • You may choose to wear an insulin pump if you begin taking more frequent
      insulin shots.

    • Watch out for weight gain that accompanies lowered blood glucose levels.
      You may need to add an extra workout a week to counteract the fact that
      you’re not losing as much glucose in your urine anymore.

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    A answered
    Synjardy is a combination of two medications, empagliflozin and metformin, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Empagliflozin removes excess sugar through the kidneys, while metformin blocks the creation of glucose in the liver and its absorption in the intestines. Synjardy is not meant to treat type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. Synjardy comes in tablet form, to be taken twice a day; it should be taken with meals to avoid stomach upset. Lactic acidosis may occur while taking Synjardy; the risk is increased with alcohol abuse, liver or kidney impairment, dehydration, sepsis, or acute congestive heart failure. Lactic acidosis can cause shock, coma, or death; if while taking this drug you experience flu-like symptoms, fruity breath, problems with urination, myalgias, breathing problems, increased sleepiness, or unusual muscle or stomach pain, consult your doctor right away. Nursing mothers should not use Synjardy. It is not known if Synjardy is safe during pregnancy. 
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    A , Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, answered
    The short answer to this question is no, but it deserves an explanation. First of all, and unfortunately, there is a severe shortage of endocrinologists in many parts of the country, so even if I thought the right answer was yes, it wouldn’t be a practical answer for everyone. But the right answer for this, and for most medical problems, is that you need a good working relationship with a primary physician who is interested in you as a person and your concerns, keeps as up-to-date as can be expected to knowing how much there is to know, communicates well and knows his or her limits. I know of family practitioners, nurse practitioners and general internists who render great diabetes care, and I know some endocrinologists who I don’t think do such a good job.
    It’s important to be your own healthcare advocate. Start by being prepared when you go in for your visits. This means having your blood tests done in advance of your visit so that you can discuss the results at the time of the appointment, brining an up-to-date list of all your medications, and bringing well-organized blood sugar readings with you. These steps will go a long way to ensuring that you get good care.
    If you’re not having success despite good care from your primary physician and a good effort on your part, ask to see an endocrinologist your doctor trusts.
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    A answered

    Many people with type 2 diabetes, especially those in the early stages, can manage their blood sugar effectively through diet, weight loss, and physical activity. But if diet and exercise alone are not adequately controlling your blood sugar, medications or insulin therapy may be able to help.

    Insulin therapy is used when prescription medications and healthy habits are not sufficiently controlling blood sugar levels, which usually occurs when your pancreas has stopped producing insulin or as a result of a serious infection or other illness. There are several different types of insulin that may be used either individually or in combination.