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What are turmeric supplements?

Maybe you don't recognize its name, but if you've ever eaten mustard or curry you've certainly sampled a taste. Unique in its flavor and distinguished by its yellow color, turmeric is a spice used across the globe in foods and as a dye in the textile industry.

Turmeric is made from a plant native to India known as the Curcuma longa plant. The rhizomes or roots of the plant are first harvested, then boiled, dried, and finally ground up into a fine powder. Not only is turmeric used to heighten taste of food or to color fabrics, it has also been used for centuries in traditional eastern cultures and Ayuredic medicine. It's even been used to make a paste and when applied to the face and subsequently scrubbed off, turmeric can remove facial hair. Scientists throughout the world are now studying turmeric's potential to treat an assortment of medical ailments.

Turmeric is recognized for its medical anti-inflammatory properties as well as a powerful antioxidant. Researchers are evaluating its use to treat high cholesterol, rheumatoid arthritis, scabies and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Additionally, it is possible it may help in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease and various forms of cancer. Some people use turmeric to treat diarrhea and bladder infections.

There's still much to learn about turmeric and its potential use as a medicine as research continues.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.