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Does someone who wears sun protection develop fewer lines?

Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD
Dermatology
Sun damage causes most wrinkling in the first place. Antioxidants like green tea are currently being studied for their potential to avert free-radical damage and consequently help prevent wrinkles. However, the jury is still out and many antioxidant products don't offer a stable, and thereby effective, form of the ingredient. They also can't substitute for the powerful protection of a sunblock. It's the one proven, preemptive, anti-aging product out there. The only topical skin care products that can truly prevent wrinkling are sunblock and retinoic acid. The regular use of prescription-strength Retin- A has been proven to decrease the development of fine lines and increase the formation of collagen, but this is far different from applying a basic moisturizer every day.
Simple Skin Beauty: Every Woman's Guide to a Lifetime of Healthy, Gorgeous Skin

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Simple Skin Beauty: Every Woman's Guide to a Lifetime of Healthy, Gorgeous Skin

What if a leading dermatologist just happened to be your best friend and you could ask her anything? DR. ELLEN MARMUR, a world-renowned New York City dermatologist, answers all your questions with...
Dr. Mehmet Oz, MD
Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease)

People who wear sun protection are likely to develop fewer lines and wrinkles than those who do not. The sun breaks down components of skin that keep it elastic. This makes skin more leathery in texture. Wearing sunscreen everyday will slow the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Wearing wide-brimmed hats and long-sleeved shirts while in the sun will help as well. Talk to your dermatologist for more information.

 

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.