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How common are headaches after having a stroke?

Headaches are common in cases of hemorrhagic (bleeding) strokes. Headaches are uncommon in ischemic strokes, which are caused by blockage of blood flow to the brain and are the most common type of stroke.

A lot of people with strokes have headaches before and during the stroke, and sometimes after. Most of the time headaches will go away as you heal.

Dr. Steven A. Meyers, MD
Diagnostic Radiologist

Headaches can occur before, during, or after a stroke. Some medications used to prevent stroke can cause headache temporarily. The new onset of a headache that you have not experienced previously should always be discussed with your doctor. While most headaches are not due to a serious problem, they should always be evaluated.

Headaches can occur during or after a stroke. In fact, about one or two out of 10 stroke patients have a headache. And, it is not uncommon to have a headache that persists for a few weeks after a stroke.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.