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What increases my risk for stage 2 rectal cancer?

Your risk for rectal cancer can stem from genetics or a previous medical condition. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis can put you at a higher risk for rectal cancer, so be sure to go through rectal cancer screenings recommended by your doctor. A tendency to develop polyps that can lead to rectal cancer can run in families, so tell your doctor if a family member has had either polyps, rectal cancer, or another cancer of the digestive tract. Some environmental factors can increase the risk of rectal cancer, too, such as eating too much fat and not enough fiber, smoking, or drinking too much alcohol. Being African American, obese, diabetic, sedentary, or over 50 also increases your risk, as does having been treated with radiation therapy in the past.

Continue Learning about Stage 2 Rectal Cancer

Does stage 2 rectal cancer affect children differently than adults?
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Rectal cancer in children is very rare. Rectal cancer usually occurs in adults who have reached midd...
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What do I need to know about caring for someone with stage 2 rectal cancer?
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Someone with stage 2 rectal cancer will likely need a colectomy. A colectomy is major surgery that r...
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Are there alternative treatments for stage 2 rectal cancer?
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To treat rectal cancer, you will need to have the cancer removed. There is no reliable alternative t...
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Should I talk to my doctor about my stage 2 rectal cancer symptoms?
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If you experience any symptoms of rectal cancer, tell your doctor immediately. The recovery rate of ...
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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.