Advertisement

Should I lift weights before a combine since most tests are movement-based?

Lifting is very important leading up to a combine even though most tests are movement-based; depending on your position, you might be lifting quite extensively. Many combine preparation programs split training into two workouts a day, lasting anywhere from 1-3 hours depending on the focus and the athlete's performance and recoverability. It's a wise plan to continue lifting 2-5 times per week, as long as your resistance training volume is well-balanced with movement training. All lifting for the combine is meant to enhance the movement demands of the combine tests. If you need to improve your starts and vertical jumps, then you will lift more. If your split time from 20-40 yards needs help along with your pro shuttle and L-drill technique, then you will lift a little less. You should avoid thinking of lifting to increase muscle size and focus more on the raw power effects you receive from an appropriately scheduled training program.

Continue Learning about Sports & Athletic Performance

Sports Physicals 101: Who Needs Them and Why
Sports Physicals 101: Who Needs Them and Why
For many students, the back to school routine usually involves seeing their doctor for a yearly checkup. Once kids reach middle school, high school an...
Read More
Is it necessary for athletic programs to have defibrillators at schools?
National Academy of Sports MedicineNational Academy of Sports Medicine
Any athletic program should have an automatic external defibrillator or AED on hand. It is one of th...
More Answers
Calories Elite Athletes Burn During Summer Sports
Calories Elite Athletes Burn During Summer SportsCalories Elite Athletes Burn During Summer SportsCalories Elite Athletes Burn During Summer SportsCalories Elite Athletes Burn During Summer Sports
Learn how many calories top athletes might burn playing these summer games.
Start Slideshow
Are Athletes Programmed to Succeed?
Are Athletes Programmed to Succeed?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.