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How important is cardio for boardsports?

At first glance, most boardsports look to be short, easy runs. However, there are a lot of repeated anaerobic intervals involved. Because of this high anaerobic demand, conditioning becomes very important for anyone doing any type of boardsport. The main training focus should be on the anaerobic system and based on how long your runs are in competition. This will also determine how long your intervals should be and the rest required in between. For some snowboarding events, a run could be approximately thirty seconds of high intensity, with this often being repeated two minutes later. When designing your conditioning, perform thirty seconds of high intensity on controlled cardio equipment (so that you are able to measure workload such as watts, level, or speed), then take a two minute break before repeating. Doing this several times a week will help build up your anaerobic system without adding any additional stress to the joints. The other training days in the week can consist of longer rides at a lower intensity to build endurance.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.