What are the different types of primary bone cancer?

What are the different types of primary bone cancer?

Cancer can begin in any type of bone tissue. Bones are made up of osteoid (hard or compact), cartilaginous (tough, flexible), and fibrous (threadlike) tissue, as well as elements of bone marrow (soft, spongy tissue in the center of most bones).

Common types of primary bone cancer include:

Osteosarcoma, which arises from osteoid tissue in the bone. This tumor occurs most often in the knee and upper arm. Chondrosarcoma, which begins in cartilaginous tissue. Cartilage pads the ends of bones and lines the joints. Chondrosarcoma occurs most often in the pelvis (located between the hip bones), upper leg, and shoulder. Sometimes a chondrosarcoma contains cancerous bone cells. In that case, doctors classify the tumor as an osteosarcoma. The Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors (ESFTs), which usually occur in bone but may also arise in soft tissue (muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, or other supporting tissue). Scientists think that ESFTs arise from elements of primitive nerve tissue in the bone or soft tissue. ESFTs occur most commonly along the backbone and pelvis and in the legs and arms.

Other types of cancer that arise in soft tissue are called soft tissue sarcomas. They are not bone cancer and are not described in this resource.

This answer is based on source information from National Cancer Institute.

Continue Learning about Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Adult

Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Adult

No one knows exactly what causes soft tissue sarcoma, a cancer of soft bodily tissues such as muscles, tendons and fat. The National Cancer Institute says that exposure to radiation therapy as a child and certain genetic diseases ...

such as von Recklinghausen disease can boost your risk of developing this cancer as an adult. If you have such a tumor, you might notice a lump or swelling in a certain area and feel pain or have trouble breathing from the tumor pressing on nerves or organs.
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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.