Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Adult

Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Adult

No one knows exactly what causes soft tissue sarcoma, a cancer of soft bodily tissues such as muscles, tendons and fat. The National Cancer Institute says that exposure to radiation therapy as a child and certain genetic diseases such as von Recklinghausen disease can boost your risk of developing this cancer as an adult. If you have such a tumor, you might notice a lump or swelling in a certain area and feel pain or have trouble breathing from the tumor pressing on nerves or organs.

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    A Surgical Oncology, answered on behalf of
    Sarcomas can cause normal tissue to be moved aside, invade normal tissue or impinge upon blood vessels and nerves. This can cause weakness, numbness and tingling of your arm or leg. Sarcomas can also spread to other areas of your body. Certain types of sarcoma can spread inside your abdomen, but the most common place for a sarcoma to spread is to your lungs. Your doctor will perform a complete workup to rule out spread anywhere else. After undergoing treatment for your sarcoma, you will also have surveillance imaging of the initial site of the sarcoma (such as your arm or leg), as well as of your lungs.
     
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    The doctor may use the following procedures and tests to diagnose synovial sarcoma: Biopsy: Tissue is removed for examination under a microscope. Immunohistochemical analysis: Tumor tissue is tested for certain antigen and antibody interactions common to synovial sarcoma. Ultrastructural findings: The tissue is examined using an ultramicroscope and electron microscope. Genetic testing: Tissue is tested for a specific chromosome abnormality common to synovial sarcoma.

    This answer is based on source information from National Cancer Institute.
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    Synovial sarcoma is rare. It accounts for between 5 and 10 percent of the approximately 10,000 new soft tissue sarcomas reported each year. Synovial sarcoma occurs mostly in young adults, with a median age of 26.5. Approximately 30 percent of patients with synovial sarcoma are younger than 20. This disease occurs more often in men than in women.

    This answer is based on source information from the National Cancer Institute.

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    There are several different types of primary bone cancer. Primary bone cancer originates in the bone, and it is important to determine if the cancer is primary bone cancer or if it is metastatic cancer that has spread to the bone from another type of cancer. The types of primary bone cancers include the following:
    • osteosarcoma
    • Ewing’s sarcoma
    • chondrosarcoma
    • spindle cell sarcoma
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    Synovial sarcoma is a slow-growing tumor. Because it grows slowly, a person may not have or notice symptoms for some time, resulting in a delay in diagnosis. The most common symptoms of synovial sarcoma are swelling or a mass that may be tender or painful. The tumor may limit range of motion or press against nerves and cause numbness. The symptoms of synovial sarcoma can be mistaken for those of inflammation of the joints, the bursae, or synovial tissue. These noncancerous conditions are called arthritis, bursitis, and synovitis, respectively.

    This answer is based on source information from the National Cancer Institute.

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    Adult soft tissue sarcomas are a type of cancer that causes tumors in the body's soft tissue. Examples of soft tissues are nerves, muscles, tendons, blood vessels, and fat. Different types of soft tissue sarcomas that affect adults may form in different places, but it most commonly affects the limbs and sometimes the internal organs or other areas. Most types of soft tissue sarcoma have similar symptoms and treatment options.

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    A Surgical Oncology, answered on behalf of
    While some soft tissue sarcomas are caused by known genetic conditions such as Li-Fraumeni, the majority have no known genetic component. It is unclear why some people develop sarcomas. Although many people first notice a sarcoma when they happen to bump that area, the bumping or any other trauma did not cause the sarcoma. There are no diet changes or medications that can be taken to prevent developing a sarcoma.
     
    Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider.
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    A Surgical Oncology, answered on behalf of
    A symptom of a soft tissue sarcoma is feeling a mass or a bulge in that area. People often think they’ve bumped this area and developed a bruise or bulge, but the sarcoma wasn’t caused by that bump or bruise. If you notice a new lump or mass, discuss it with your doctor. Further evaluation may include imaging studies, such as an ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This may lead to a needle biopsy. Your doctor will discuss these results with other specialists at a multidisciplinary tumor board. Treatment options may consist of a combination of radiation therapy, chemotherapy and surgical resection.
     
    Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider.
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    The type of treatment depends on the age of the patient, the location of the tumor, its size, its grade (how abnormal the cancer cells look under a microscope and how likely the tumor will quickly grow and spread), and the extent of the disease. The most common treatment is surgery to remove the entire tumor with negative margins (no cancer cells are found at the edge or border of the tissue removed during surgery). If the first surgery does not obtain negative tissue margins, a second surgery may be needed.

    The patient may also receive radiation therapy before or after surgery to control the tumor or decrease the chance of recurrence (cancer coming back). The use of intraoperative radiation therapy (radiation aimed directly at the tumor during surgery) and brachytherapy (radioactive material sealed in needles, wires, seeds, or catheters, and placed directly into or near a tumor) are under study.

    Patients may also receive chemotherapy alone or in combination with radiation therapy.

    This answer is based on source information from the National Cancer Institute.