Sodium
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The Scoop on Salt and Sodium

Pretzels! Fries! Potato chips! Americans love salty foods -- but too much can be bad. Test your smarts about salt and sodium.

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The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 1 of 20 Correct

True or false: Sea salt is better for you than table salt.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Both sea salt and table salt contain the same basic nutrients. Choose whichever one you prefer, but limit your total sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams a day.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 2 of 20 Correct

Salt is associated with which heart-related condition?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Salt is typically associated with hypertension, or high blood pressure, which can lead to heart disease.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 3 of 20 Correct

How much salt a day does the Department of Agriculture recommend for adults over 50?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: The 2010 USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends no more than 1,500 mg per day for people over 50, African Americans and individuals with hypertension, diabetes or chronic kidney disease. Everyone else should have no more than 2,300 mg a day. The average American now consumes approximately 3,400 mg of sodium per day.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 4 of 20 Correct

True or false: Salt and sodium are the same thing.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Sodium is the main ingredient in salt, and it's necessary to maintain water balance in body tissues. Too much sodium can increase fluid retention and raise blood pressure.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 5 of 20 Correct

Which has more sodium per serving?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Canned veggies can have hundreds of milligrams of added sodium. Canned goods can still be a healthy source of many vitamins and minerals, though, so opt for low-sodium versions.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 6 of 20 Correct

The number one source of salt in most diets is:

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The correct answer is: More than 80 percent of sodium in the average American diet comes from processed foods.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 7 of 20 Correct

Which of these can be healthy alternatives to salt?

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The correct answer is: Rather than salt substitutes, try herb-spice blends or lemon or lime juice as a flavorful alternative.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 8 of 20 Correct

How much sodium comes from salt in most people's diets?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: About 90 percent of the sodium in our diet comes from salt. The rest comes from other sodium-containing chemicals added to food.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 9 of 20 Correct

What healthful chemical is typically added to table salt that isn't part of sea salt?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Most table salt contains iodine, an ingredient that's been added since the 1920s to lower the risk of diseases related to iodine deficiency. Iodine deficiency can lead to enlargement of the thyroid, hypothyroidism and mental retardation in infants and children.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 10 of 20 Correct

How much is 1,500 mg?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: One teaspoon contains 2,000 mg of salt. U.S. guidelines recommend most Americans get no more than 1,500 mg to 2,300 mg of salt each day.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 11 of 20 Correct

Which of these contains sodium?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above are hidden sources of sodium.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 12 of 20 Correct

Once in the body, what is sodium considered to be?

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The correct answer is: Sodium is an electrolyte. Electrolytes are mineral salts that have an electric charge and help your body's blood chemistry, muscle performance and other systems. Other electrolytes include calcium, potassium, chlorine, phosphate and magnesium.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 13 of 20 Correct

What's the most sodium per serving a food can have to be considered low-sodium?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Low-sodium foods should have a maximum of 140 mg of sodium per serving. A single package can have more than one serving, which is why you should read labels on packaged food if you're trying to reduce your salt intake.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 14 of 20 Correct

A high-salt diet can increase your risk for which of these diseases?

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The correct answer is: Excessive salt intake can lead to all of these diseases.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 15 of 20 Correct

What percentage of people age 70 or older have high blood pressure?

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The correct answer is: Nearly 70 percent of people over the age of 70 have high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases your risk for stroke, among other conditions. The good news is that if you reduce your blood pressure through medication and lifestyle changes, these risks decrease.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 16 of 20 Correct

What is salt sensitivity?

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The correct answer is: Salt sensitivity refers to how much a person's blood pressure changes in response to changes in dietary sodium. Salt sensitivity is thought to be related to factors such as family history, kidney function, race, age and body mass.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 17 of 20 Correct

Why is it hard to lose weight when you eat too much salt?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: When you eat too much salt, your body holds on to more water to keep salt levels consistent. To lose weight, watch your calorie and salt intake.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 18 of 20 Correct

True or false: You can sweat too much salt.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. If your sweat has a salty taste or your skin feels gritty after exercise, you may be sweating a lot of salt. Use sports drinks to replace lost fluids and electrolytes.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 19 of 20 Correct

What is salt most commonly used for in the U.S.?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: We use a lot of salt in food and in water treatments, but 66 percent of salt used in the United States is put on highways to keep them from freezing.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
Question 20 of 20 Correct

What chemical is used in place of sodium chloride in salt substitutes?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Salt substitutes use potassium chloride in place of table salt. But potassium chloride can be harmful to people with kidney problems, who may be unable to rid their bodies of excessive potassium.

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
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You got out of 20 correct. You're a health wiz!

The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
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The Scoop on Salt and Sodium
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