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What is a good foot quickness drill for goal keepers?

Getting the feet to move quickly can be the difference between of making a stop or allowing a goal.  A goal keeper's ability to keep the feet low, quick, and underneath the body should be stressed throughout training.  One drill that addresses all three of these goals is the box run steps-side to side.  For this drill grab a small box (6 inches high).  Stand beside the box and place the inside foot on top of the box and the outside foot on the ground.  The goal of this drill is to switch the position of your feet as quickly as possible.  To do this, push off the foot on the ground followed by the foot on the top of the box.  The foot that started on the box will land on the ground on the opposite side of the box.  The foot that was originally on the ground should end up on the box.  Once you have done this,  quickly repeat the process and move back to the starting position.  Getting your weight quickly back on the foot on the box will allow you to move rapidly from side to side.  Avoid jumping up in the air, and keep your feet low by taking short steps.  Coordinate your arms and feet while moving side to side.
If I were a goal keeper that wanted to work on foot quickness I would make sure that my workout had a couple of components. The first component would include speed ladder work in the frontal plane. What that means is using a speed ladder placed on the ground and doing side shuffle work to develop my lateral agility. The second component would include reactive training that would include explosive jumping and proprioceptive plyometrics. If these are terms that you are not familiar with you can easily get some help by consulting a trainer that is NASM certified working with the OPT model. Both of the two above modalities of training will improve explosive strength as well as agility and if you focus in the frontal plane (side to side) you will develop the lateral speed and agility you are looking for to be an excellent goal keeper. Grabbing that ball out of the air is of course up to you. Good luck.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.