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What increases my risk for snoring?

Risk factors for snoring include:
  • being overweight
  • being male
  • being over age 50
  • being in the third trimester of pregnancy
  • a family history of snoring
  • sleeping on your back
  • drinking alcohol
  • taking certain medicines that are central nervous system depressants, such as sleeping pills
  • poor muscle tone
  • nasal obstruction due to a cold, allergies or a sinus infection
  • nasal polyps or deformed nasal structures
  • swelling in the roof of the mouth, tonsils or adenoids
Often, you can reduce these risk factors by taking a few simple steps. Change your sleep position to side sleeping. Lose weight if you need to, and don't drink alcohol before going to bed. Taking medicine for colds, allergies or a sinus infection may also reduce your risk for snoring. However, if the medicine causes drowsiness, it may act like a sleeping pill and increase the risk of snoring; a nondrowsy medicine may be preferable. 

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.