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What is rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD)?

REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) is an REM sleep disorder that is a possible early sign of Parkinson’s disease. There are a few things that happen with RBD:

  • Usually when we sleep, the body shuts down our muscle movement during REM sleep so that we can’t act out our dreams.
  • In people with RBD, this shut-down doesn’t happen.
  • In this case, people have dreams that are very vivid and violent, compelling them to talk, punch, kick, scream, and even jump out of bed.
  • Interestingly, RBD is usually seen in middle-aged to elderly people, and is more likely to happen in men than in women.

In addition to being a possible early sign of Parkinson’s, RBD prevents people from getting restful sleep, mostly because they are so active during their dreams. Either way, it is important to keep studying this REM sleep disorder and other sleep disorders. The long-term dangers are too scary to ignore.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.