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Are there different types of Kaposi sarcoma?

Types of Kaposi sarcoma are classified according to the group of people who are affected by that form of the disease. On a cellular level, the types are very similar, but they affect very different groups. Classic Kaposi sarcoma affects older men of Mediterranean or Eastern European descent. Usually, the lesions in this type of Kaposi sarcoma develop on the legs and are less aggressive. The most common type of Kaposi sarcoma in the United States is epidemic, or AIDS-related, Kaposi sarcoma. This affects people with HIV and is called an "AIDS-defining" illness, meaning once people with HIV develop this disease, it's said they officially have AIDS. This type can be very aggressive and turn life-threatening quickly. Other types of Kaposi sarcoma include endemic or African, which may affect people of any age or sex, and iatrogenic, or transplant-associated, which develops in people who have received organ transplants and are on drugs that suppress the immune system.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.