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What can I do to be supportive when my aging loved one stops driving?

Dr. Aruna V. Josyula, MD
Geriatric Medicine Specialist

You can help your aging loved one give up driving in a number of ways. You can arrange to have medications (and in some places, groceries) delivered to the home. Work with your loved one to create a plan for social outings for which transportation can be arranged through family, friends or church. Reassure your loved one that he or she did the right thing, for both personal safety and that of the public, by giving up driving.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.