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What causes disorganized schizophrenia?

Donna Hill Howes, RN
Family Medicine
No one knows exactly what causes schizophrenia, whether it is the disorganized type or one of the other four types of schizophrenia (paranoid, catatonic, undifferentiated, and residual). Experts think that your genes and your environment (such as being exposed to viruses in the womb) may interact in ways that make some people more vulnerable to the disease than others. An imbalance in certain chemicals in the brain (the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate) may also contribute to causing the disease. More research needs to be done to learn what causes schizophrenia.

The exact cause of disorganized schizophrenia remains unknown. However, researchers have been able to identify some factors that might lead to the development of disorganized (or any other type) of schizophrenia. These factors include heredity, birth defects, and a person's environment. Most doctors believe one of these variables triggers a problem in the way the brain's chemical messengers work.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.