Dial In Romance, Turn Off the Phone
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Dial In Romance, Turn Off the Phone

The MLB's rules of player conduct state no use of mobile phones, laptops, or texting in the clubhouse within an hour of game time and on the bench or field any time. But, says Boston sports writer Adam Jones, that didn’t keep Red Sox second baseman Pablo Sandoval from running back into the clubhouse to use his phone to access Instagram during a 5-2 loss to the Braves last June.

That kind of disregard for what you should be focusing on is rampant these days, and even has a name: Phubbing, short for phone snubbing. In fact, recent research, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior found that almost 50 percent of folks have been phubbed by their partner and it’s damaging their love life and bumming them out.

What are signs you’re being phubbed? Your honey positions his or her cellphone so it can be seen when you’re together; your partner glances at the phone while taking to you; and whenever there’s a lull in conversation your partner checks the phone.

More importantly -- what’s the solution? Mention your concern (or text it, if necessary!) and negotiate a step-by-step change in behavior: Start by asking that the phone be kept face down on tabletops. After a week, ask for it to remain in a pocket or purse. Want to be really daring? Ask that it be turned off or left at home. Remember the human race got along okay for many thousand of years before there were cell phones.

Relationships and Family

Relationships and Family

Relationships and family are at the center of human life, and they can have a huge influence on your health. Having good friendships and family support eases stress, helps you avoid mental illness, and gives you energy and courage ...

for living a healthier life. Relationships start when you give someone else your time and attention. If you find yourself isolated, the best thing to do is reach out through community activities or family connections. Finding ways to help others will make you feel better, and then pay off later when you need support. Good health means caring for yourself, which is infinitely easier to do when other people are also caring for you. If your relationships are in trouble, take steps to resolve the conflict through communication or seeking counseling. The payoff is greater well-being for all involved.
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