Quit Smoking

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    A , Medical Toxicology, answered
    What are the health concerns about smoking (vaping) caffeine?
    Since caffeine is typically ingested, not inhaled, there are several health concerns about smoking (vaping) caffeine and similar stimulant ingredients. In this video, toxicologist Gary Ginsberg, PhD, shares his concerns about this recent trend.
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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Spice is an herb that is supposed to be used for incense. It can be bought in smoke shops, or at least it used to be possible to buy it in smoke shops. But at some point, people started trying to smoke it to get high. It has marijuana-type properties, plus there are other things in it. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been trying to figure out what's in it and how it works.

    It does contain psychoactive substances that cause people to have fairly severe hallucinations. The people I have seen who have smoked spice claim it's not a pleasant experience. They vomit and feel uncomfortable. And all of them, without exception, have said they’ll never do it again, because it was so unpleasant.
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    Currently, there is no research that proves that vaping is safer than smoking. Early studies have shown that vaping products may contain more nicotine and carcinogenic agents than cigarettes. Be wary of information distributed by vaping companies. This is concerning as many patients are using e-cigarettes or other vaping tools in an attempt to stop smoking. If you are considering e-cigarettes, discuss it with your healthcare provider.
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    A Hematology & Oncology, answered on behalf of
    What are pack years for a smoker?
    Pack years are the number of years a person has smoked multiplied by the number of packs smoked per day. In this video, oncologist Elwyn Cabebe, MD, of Good Samaritan Hospital gives some examples of how to calculate pack years.
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    E-cigarettes are relatively new, and not very much is known about how harmful they are to your heart. E-cigarettes are often advertised as a safer alternative to regular cigarettes.  E-cigarettes are currently not regulated, and therefore, we do not know what chemicals or toxins may be present. Due to this, many medical societies recommend caution with use of e-cigarettes until more is known about their safety.
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    Is There Second-Hand Smoke with E-Cigarettes?
    The vapor that is being exhaled with e-cigarettes can be re-inhaled by someone else. In this video, addiction specialist Douglas Severance, MD, talks about the second hand smoke from an electronic cigarette.
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    A , Medical Toxicology, answered
    Are e-cigarettes a safe alternative to conventional cigarettes?
    E-cigarettes don't contain the tar and carcinogens that traditional cigarettes have, but there are still health risks to inhaling nicotine. Watch toxicologist Gary Ginsberg, PhD, explain the pros and cons of using e-cigarettes as a cessation tool. 
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Are people getting better about keeping their homes and cars smoke free?

    Many people have smoke-free rules for their homes and cars. The amount of exposure to secondhand smoke in the U.S. varies by state. In this video, Robin Miller, MD shares which states have the least and greatest exposure to secondhand smoke.

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    In the United States, 40% of men and 34% of women with mental illness are smokers. Additionally, 48% of all smokers with mental illness are at or below poverty level.

    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    Although effective new strategies have increased the success rates among people attempting to quit, those rates are still only about 20 percent. But a relapse shouldn’t be seen as a sign that trying to quit is futile. “If you’ve tried before, statistics show you actually have a better chance of being successful,” UCLA internist Mark S. McGowan, M.D., says.

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