Prostate Cancer

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Prostate cancer is a disease that affects older men primarily and is never found in children. The average age for someone diagnosed with prostate cancer is 67 years old. Only a half-percent of those diagnosed are between the ages of 35 and 44, the youngest age group affected by the disease.

  • 3 Answers
    A
    A Hematology & Oncology, answered on behalf of
    BPH is a benign enlargement of the prostate and not related to cancer in any way.  BPH and prostate cancer share similar symptoms, and a patient with BPH could also have an elevated PSA. 
    See All 3 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A Hematology & Oncology, answered on behalf of
    Latent prostate cancer, also known as indolent prostate cancer, can be small areas of prostate cancer in which the majority do not develop into significant disease. They do not cause symptoms, and seldom require therapy.  
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of male cancer deaths, with a lifetime risk of one in 30 from dying of this cancer.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 3 Answers
    A
    Prostate cancer, like many cancers, initially just affects the body organ where it started (in this case the prostate). If the prostate cancer continues to grow, it can block or obstruct the urethra, which carries urine from the bladder through the penis. This can cause urinary obstruction and kidney damage. Prostate cancer can metastasize, which means it can spread outside the prostate. It often spreads to the bones, which can cause a lot of pain. 
    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Urology, answered on behalf of
    Unlike slow-growing indolent prostate cancer, a more aggressive type of prostate cancer can spread throughout the body to the lymph nodes; to the bones, where it can cause painful symptoms; and to other areas of the body as well. These are the cases that need to be identified and treated early.
  • 3 Answers
    A
    A answered
    Stage I:  The cancer is found only in the prostate. The tumor cannot be felt during a digital rectal exam (DRE) and does not show up with any imaging technology.

    Stage IIA: The tumor has grown within the prostate but has not spread outside of the prostate. It can be felt in one half of one side of the prostate.

    Stage IIB: The tumor has grown within the prostate but has not spread outside of the prostate. It can be felt on the top or bottom half of the prostate.

    Stage IIC: The tumor has grown within the prostate but has not spread outside of the prostate. Abnormalities can be felt in both sides of the prostate.

    Stage III: Cancer has spread beyond the capsule of the prostate into the area immediately beyond the capsule.

    Stage IV: Cancer has metastasized, or spread, beyond the prostate to other areas like the bladder, rectum, lymph nodes and bones. This stage of prostate cancer is not usually considered curable.
    See All 3 Answers
  • 5 Answers
    A
    Prostate cancer stages are clearly identifiable. Your doctor will examine the cancer tissues to determine the stage of the disease. 
    • Stage I: Cancer is confined to the prostate. It can’t be detected during a digital rectal exam (DRE). It is usually expected to be slow growing.
    • Stage II: Cancer can be detected during a DRE. It’s still confined to the prostate, but the cells may be more abnormal and may grow faster.
    • Stage III: Cancer is in tissues near the prostate. It also may have reached the seminal vesicles.
    • Stage IV: Cancer has invaded other parts of the body, such as the rectum, nearby lymph nodes or bone.
    • Recurrent: Cancer has returned after treatment. It may recur in the prostate area or in other places, such as the bones.
    See All 5 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Hematology & Oncology, answered
    Ultimately, the prognosis and decisions about treatment for prostate cancer depend on staging. A staging system is a common way of describing how far the cancer has progressed. There are different staging systems for prostate cancer, but the most widely used one is the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) system, short for tumor-node-metastasis. It describes the extent of the primary tumor, whether the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes, and whether it has spread to distant sites.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    What Does Gleason 6 Mean in Prostate Cancer?
    Gleason 6 is a slow growing prostate cancer. In this video, Simon Hall, MD, chairman of the department of urology at The Mount Sinai Medical Center and director of the Deane Prostate Health and Research Center, discusses this common form of cancer.