Preschool Age Child Emotional & Social Development

Preschool Age Child Emotional & Social Development

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    A , Psychology, answered
    First, find a private moment to model the skill to your child. Talk about why the skill is important, and then be sure your child can show you how to do the skill correctly. It’s helpful to go with your child to a  public place such as a playground or school yard, so she can observe other kids actually using the skill. Seeing the skill in action helps your child copy it, so she can try it on her own.

    Remember: Kids learn skills best when you SHOW–not TELL–them what it looks like. You can point it out. Model the skill yourself. Have “teddy bear” practice with “Peter Rabbit.” Role play. Ask your child to teach another child. Video it. Put it on skype. Be creative! But don’t lecture about it.. show it! You can also help your child look for the skill on a television show or movie (”Let’s look for kids who introduce themselves to a new group.”)
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Just telling your child about the skill is not enough. Your child needs to try out the skill with other children. The best kids for your child to practice with are peers she doesn’t already know and those who are younger or less skilled. Keep the practice session short, and stand back at a comfortable distance! If your child is having problems in the group, offer suggestions only privately–never in front of other kids. Make sure you practice the sessions at home. Get the other family members involved!
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Accept your child’s natural temperament. Don't try to change your introvert into a social butterfly.

    Create a one-to-ten tension scale a child can use to express their fear level. One is no fear, while ten is maximum fear, and five is somewhere in the middle.

    Emphasize prior success. Help your child recall previous times when things went really well.

    Schedule warm up time. Some kids take longer to warm up in a social setting, so give your child time to settle in. 

    Reinforce any social efforts. Praise any and every effort your child makes to be even a bit more social.

    Practice skills with younger peers. Pairing older kids with younger children for brief periods is a proven way to help the older child try out new social skills that he may feel uncomfortable about with friends his own age.

    Make One-to-One Playdates. Research finds that one of the best ways to help shyer kids gain social confidence is with “one-on-one play dates.”

    Reinforce smiling! One of the most common traits of confident, well-liked kids is that they smile and smile.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Sensitizing children to how someone else feels is a significant and serious enterprise. Kids can’t do this alone–they must be supported, supervised, and encouraged to develop sensitivity and consideration, and parents play an key role in this endeavor. The true parenting challenge is to use those unplanned moments when a child’s behavior is unacceptable as a learning tool to become more responsive to the feelings of others. Besides, that’s always the best kind of lesson: one that helps the child discover for herself why she should be kind and realize her uncaring, insensitive actions may affect others by understanding how the other person feels.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Sensitive, empathic, kind acts-even small ones-can make a big difference in people’s lives, so point them out to help your child see the impact his actions made. “Derrick, your grandmother was so pleased when you called to thank her for the present.” “Suraya, did you see the smile on Ryan’s face when you shared your toys?”
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    A , Psychology, answered
    From a young age, expose your child to positive images-including toys, music, literature, videos, public role models, and examples from TV or newspaper reports-that represent a variety of ethnic groups. Encourage your child, no matter how young, to have contact with individuals of different races, religions, cultures, genders, abilities, and beliefs. The more your child sees how you embrace diversity, the more prone he’ll be to follow your standards.

    Use multicultural literature: Jan Arnow, author of Teaching Peace, points out that “only 10 percent of the almost five thousand children’s books published each year in the United States are multicultural in nature. Of those, fewer than fifty titles annually have been written about Native American and Asian peoples.” That is a troubling statistic, because research says that children first become aware of race and gender differences around two years of age, around the time many parents have started nightly bedtime traditions of reading with their kids. Expose your child early to a variety of multicultural literature that features positive images of all cultures and genders. It is one way to increase tolerance as well as reduce or prevent prejudice.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    The following steps can help you help your child to be more tolerant:

    Confront your own prejudices. The first step to nurturing tolerance is to examine your own prejudices and reflect on how you might be projecting those ideas to your child.

    Commit to raising a tolerant child. Parents who think through how they want their kids to turn out usually succeed simply because they planned their parenting efforts.

    Help your child develop identify and pride in his culture. The starting place to help children understand diversity is for them to look at their own ancestry.

    Refuse to allow discriminatory comments. When you hear prejudicial comments, verbalize your displeasure.

    Embrace diversity. From a young age, expose your child to positive images-including toys, music, literature, videos, public role models, and examples from TV or newspaper reports-that represent a variety of ethnic groups.

    Emphasize similarities. Encourage your child to look for what he has in common with others instead of how he is different.

    Give straightforward, simple answers to questions about differences. Kids are naturally curious, so you should expect questions about differences.

    Counter discriminatory beliefs. When you hear a child make a prejudicial comment, listen to find out why he feels the way he does.

    Live your life as an example of tolerance. The best way for your child to learn tolerance is for him to watch and listen to your daily example.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Tolerance is a powerful virtue that helps curtail hatred, bullying, violence, and bigotry while at the same time influencing us to treat others with kindness, respect, and understanding. While tolerance doesn’t call upon us to suspend moral judgment, it does require us to respect differences. This virtue is what helps our children recognize that all persons deserve to be treated with dignity, justice and respect even if we happen to disagree with some of their beliefs or behaviors. And it is a critical component of moral intelligence that we must build in our children.

    Intolerance can be demonstrated in many ways-verbally, physically, or in combination-but in every case the perpetrator displays cold-hearted disrespect for his victims targeting their race, ethnicity, age, religion, disability, beliefs, gender, appearance, behavior or sexual orientation. Whatever method the perpetrator uses, act of intolerance always cause the victim pain.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Four strategies that follow are ones that experts agree are some of the most effective ways to begin to help kids understand kindness:

    1. Consciously model kindness. Your child learns a great deal about morality simply by your behavior. That’s why it’s so important to model what you want your child to copy. If you want your child to be kind whenever you are together, consciously demonstrate kind behavior. We tend to do kind behaviors so naturally that our children may miss them, so deliberately tune them up.

    2. Expect and then demand kindness. Spell out loudly and clearly your expectation that others must be treated kindly. It sets a standard for your child’s expected conduct and also lets her know in no uncertain terms what you value.

    3. Teach the meaning of kindness. One of the most important steps in teaching kindness is making sure kids know what kindness means, and it’s a step too often overlooked. So take time to define the virtue.

    4. Show what kindness looks like. You can do this activity with your child any time you are together in a place filled with people: a store, the airport, a mall, or the school grounds. Tell her that the object is to look for people who show kindness to others.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    A major step in reducing selfishness in kids is simply not tolerating it. You’re right: it won’t be easy. After all, especially if your kid is used to having his every whim catered for a long time. But if you really are serious about changing this attitude, you must stand firm and be consistent. Start by clearly laying down your new attitude expectations: “In this house you are always to be considerate of others.” Then loudly state your disapproval each and every time your child acts selfishly. Be sure to state why their behavior was wrong, and if the selfish attitude continues, consider applying consequences.

    “That was selfish: I expect you to treat your friends the same way you’d want to be treated.”

    “I’m very concerned when I see you monopolizing all the video games and not sharing them with your friend. You may not treat people selfishly.”