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How can I make my entry system more accessible?

To make your entry system more accessible, install a visual cue for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Wire your doorbell to a light on the inside that flashes when the doorbell rings. Any number of commercial beacons and light/vibration signalers are available from organizations that cater to the deaf and hard of hearing. Ask if you may try out the device before you buy.

Consider a doorbell intercom to make answering the door easier. If you have difficulty getting to the door to answer it before your visitor leaves, consider replacing your current door bell with an intercom model like you see at security-locked apartments. Place the receiver in a convenient location and when the door bell rings, a buzzer notifies you; you can then talk to the person at the door and let them know you are coming. Add an electric door latch and you can press a button and let the person into your home without getting up. Some models work with your hard-wired telephones, so you can talk to the person at the door from any telephone in the home. You will find these devices at home improvement stores and from companies that sell home security devices, or your Independent Living Center (ILC) may have options you may try first.

Driveway alerts will signal the arrival of visitors. Install a wireless driveway alert and when a vehicle enters your driveway, the inside base station will chime, notifying you of visitors and giving you more notice to get to the door. Most devices mount in ground or on a post next to the driveway and send a signal up to 400 feet away. Choose one with an electromagnetic sensor that detects vehicles (mass metal) moving within 3 to 12 feet so that you do not get false alarms from animals moving past the sensor. A sensitivity adjustment is also helpful. You will find these devices at home improvement stores and from companies that sell home security devices.

Use a garage door opener to let guests into the house. If you have an attached garage and garage door opener, you can use it to let people in when you are lying down or home alone and unable to get to the door.
Home Accessibility (300 Tips for Making Life Easier)

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Home Accessibility (300 Tips for Making Life Easier)

Written by the best-selling author of Multiple Sclerosis: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier and Parkinson's Disease: 300 Tips for Making Life Easier, Home Accessibility: 300 Tips for Making Life...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.