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What medications treat parkinson's disease?

Nader Pouratian, MD
Neurosurgery
The medical management of Parkinson’s disease is complicated, but the mainstay of therapy is going to be levodopa, which is the gold standard that we use for Parkinson’s disease. There are other medications, like anticholinergics, trihexyphenidyl, amantadine, the inhibitors of COMT and MAO-A, and finally dopamine agonists, which are used quite extensively, but those can have some problems with impulse control and other issues that limit their use, as well.

In any case, the important thing here is that there are a lot of medications, and if someone you know has Parkinson’s disease and he's having trouble managing with his medications, it’s really important that he see a movement disorders neurologist who really knows his medications and knows how to balance them. People can do quite well on medications for quite a number of years -- up to 10, 20 years. There are stories of people who are even able to hide their disease from their spouse. That’s how well the medications can work.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.