Advertisement

What information should I give my child’s babysitter?

A babysitter should know the following things about your child:

  • Your child’s routine, including mealtime, bath time and bedtime
  • Any special health information about your child, including allergies and medication needs
  • Your child’s fears and phobias
  • Favorite and forbidden foods
  • Your general house rules, including child safety issues
  • Rules for the babysitter, such as no non-emergency phone calls, no visitors, food to eat and whether or not they can leave the home
  • Emergency contact details and where you’ll be (will you have a cell phone?)
  • Emergency phone numbers such as Poison Control (1-800-222-1222) and 911
  • Phone number for relatives, friends and neighbors in case you can’t be reached
  • Child’s doctors’ names and contact information
  • Insurance provider and policy
  • Preferred hospital in case of emergency
  • Where smoke detectors and fire extinguishers are located, and all exits from home in case of fire
  • Where security system/alarms are located and how to work them
  • Where door keys are located in case a child gets locked inside a room
  • Where your first aid kit is kept

From Good Kids, Bad Habits: The RealAge Guide to Raising Healthy Children by Jennifer Trachtenberg.

Good Kids, Bad Habits: The RealAge Guide to Raising Healthy Children

More About this Book

Good Kids, Bad Habits: The RealAge Guide to Raising Healthy Children

When kids start going on TV binges or devouring fistfuls of cookies, it's easy to say, "They'll grow out of it." More likely, they're acquiring bad habits that could lead to childhood obesity and...

You should give your child’s babysitter the following information:

Personal information

  • your child’s full name and date of birth (you’ll need this information for every child in the house)
  • your full home address, including cross streets (in case a call needs to be made to 911 or other emergency responders)

Medical information

  • medical conditions and past surgeries (from childbirth on, including any hospital stays, such as the neonatal intensive care unit as an infant)
  • allergies
  • medications taken
  • insurance cards

Physician information

  • pediatrician’s name, address and phone numbers
  • dentist’s name, address and phone numbers
  • pediatric emergency room (ER) or hospital where you’d want your child to be taken or transferred if he or she requires additional medical care after being treated and stabilized in the pediatric ER

Contact information

  • all phone numbers to reach you, including the name and number of your hotel and anyone else at your location who could get in contact with you
  • phone numbers of your closest relatives
  • phone numbers and address of your nearest reliable neighbor who agrees to help (leave a second in-town person as backup)
  • poison control center number

Permission to treat form
​​​
This form gives a doctor permission to provide medical treatment when your child is in someone else's care, whether it's a babysitter or a relative such as a grandparent. If a child is legally considered a minor, the ER must regard the child as such. Requirements for such authorizations may vary by state and/or facilities, so be sure to check what is required in yours.

This checklist is intended as a guide only. Additional information may be necessary to address your specific healthcare circumstances.

Continue Learning about Parenting

New Screening Guidelines for Kids: What Parents Should Know
New Screening Guidelines for Kids: What Parents Should Know
In 2017, the American Academy of Pediatrics updated its schedule of the preventive screenings children and adolescents need. The most notable changes ...
Read More
What can I do to help my child open up?
Michele BorbaMichele Borba
• Once you tune up your communication skills, your next step is to tweak your conversation topics. I...
More Answers
The Scoop on Baby Poop: 5 Hues and What They Mean
The Scoop on Baby Poop: 5 Hues and What They MeanThe Scoop on Baby Poop: 5 Hues and What They MeanThe Scoop on Baby Poop: 5 Hues and What They MeanThe Scoop on Baby Poop: 5 Hues and What They Mean
Here’s what’s common, what’s not—and when to call the doc.
Start Slideshow
A Car Makeover to Get You Organized
A Car Makeover to Get You Organized

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.