Parent-Child Relationship

Parent-Child Relationship

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    If you fight a lot, it helps if you and your parents can give yourselves a timeout similar to the ones they may have given you when you were a kid. Surely you remember when they removed you from a situation so that you could calm yourself down. This timeout allows all of you to step out of the heat of the moment and really think about what you want to discuss.

    Taking yourself out of the hot state into a more rational cold state will work better for all of you. You may not always get what you want, but they’ll be more likely to understand your point of view if you can strip away the emotion and/or attitude that often comes
    with arguments.

    Pick your battles. It’s not in your best interest to argue over everything, and you’ll be more effective if you make your case when there’s something you really want at stake. And try to be sensitive to stresses in your parents’ lives. Don’t raise a touchy subject when they’re rushing off to work or have just come home from a draining day taking care of your sick grandmother.

    The best way to get “stuff ” or “privileges” is not to make demands or tell your parents that everyone else is going to the [name pop star] concert and they’re being unfair by not letting you go too. Rather, offer to earn what you want, and you’ll earn your parents’ trust at the same time. Is there a set of weekly chores that you can do, such as taking out the garbage or washing the dishes or walking the dog or doing the laundry? 

    Taking on household chores puts credit in the parent bank that you can draw on later. Also, never underestimate the power of manners. A little friendliness or even asking your parents about their day can go a long way toward understanding one another and maybe even bring you closer.

    If you just can’t see eye to eye with your parents, seek out another adult who can give you the support you need without all the emotional baggage—perhaps a relative, teacher, coach, employer, guidance counselor, or spiritual leader. It’s important for you to have mentors and good relationships with adults for many reasons (including enjoying the benefits of oxytocin).    

  • 3 Answers
    A
    A , Psychology, answered
    Dr. Tamar Chansky - How can I discuss difficult topics with my child?

    When something bad or difficult happens, it's important to know how to explain it to kids. In this video, psychologist Dr. Tamar Chansky, who specializes in anxiety, offers tips for helping a child through an upsetting time.


    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered

    As a parent, you are your children’s biggest role model. Your principles and beliefs greatly influence and shape how your child views himself. Anything you can do that gives you a chance to connect to your children and spend time with them is a positive thing. It doesn’t really matter what it is: walking, shopping, watching movies, even doing chores together (although this may not be your kid’s favorite thing to do with you). Doing activities together as a family or just one-on-one, parent and child, encourages family bonding, making your child feel secure and connected, and boosts his or her self-esteem. Something as simple as taking a walk around the block with your child will give you a chance to check in with each other and get beyond the one-word answer “Fine” to your question, “How was school today?”

    From Good Kids, Bad Habits: The RealAge Guide to Raising Healthy Children by Jennifer Trachtenberg.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Psychology, answered
    One-on-one communication enhances the parent-child relationship, boosts communication and allows parents to model those essential interpersonal social and emotional skills our tech-dependent kids so desperately need.

    To help encourage eye contact, face-to-face interaction and tuning in to one another enforce one family rule: "Always look at the color of the talker's eye."

    Take time for those crucial informal chats! Discussion topics are endless if you're needing some. A big hint: use your children's world. For instance:
    • Clip interesting articles from the newspaper.
    • Discuss the new movie reviews.
    • Debate who is going to win that big game or the election (and who really should).
    • Go online and peruse your kids' school website to chat about those upcoming activities.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Psychology, answered on behalf of
    Attunement is a system of communication between the parent and child. It's a way the child expresses something. Maybe it's dissatisfaction. Maybe it's "I got my hand stuck in a chair and I can't get it out," or maybe it's a bid for the parent's attention and it's, "Mom, I want your attention right now. I need you. I want you."

    The parent's role is to observe the child, read the cue, decode the cue, which sometimes is the hardest part, and then respond to it. When this happens, the child then signals back to the parent that this is exactly what was needed, or this wasn't quite what was needed and the child is still distressed. This results in a back and forth between the parent and child. Sometimes we call it a serve and return interplay between the parent and the child. It is key for a parent to pay attention to what triggers the child's emotions and then be able to respond to those emotions.