Oxycodone

Oxycodone

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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    OxyContin CR is a name some people may use when referring to the medication OxyContin (oxycodone). OxyContin is prescribed for treating moderate to severe pain. OxyContin comes in a tablet that gradually releases medicine over a 12-hour period. This action is sometimes called "controlled release," and "CR" is an abbreviation for that term. However, no drug sold in the United States has the brand name OxyContin CR.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    If you have hypotension, asthma, COPD, or other breathing disorders, kidney disease, epilepsy or seizure disorders, mental illness, or a history of drug abuse you might not be able to take oxycodone hydrochloride. Thyroid conditions, gallbladder disorders, stomach, pancreas, or intestinal disorders, adrenal disorders, urinary disorders, an enlarged prostate, history of head injury or brain tumor, or a curvature of the spine are all conditions that may keep you from taking oxycodone hydrochloride. Because oxycodone hydrochloride is metabolized by the liver, those who have liver disease should receive it with caution or not at all.

    Anyone who is addicted to drugs or alcohol should not take oxycodone hydrochloride. The effects of oxycodone hydrochloride on pregnant women is not known but it should not be used unless absolutely necessary. Nursing mothers should not use oxycodone hydrochloride as it can pass through breast milk and possibly harm your baby.

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    An allergic reaction to oxycodone hydrochloride can cause swelling of your face, lips, tongue, and throat, making it difficult to breathe. You may notice a rash or hives as well. Contact your doctor and get immediate medical attention if you experience any of these symptoms.

    Serious side effects that warrant calling your doctor are:

    • shallow breathing
    • slow heartbeat
    • seizure (convulsions
    • cold, clammy skin
    • confusion
    • severe weakness or dizziness
    • feeling light-headed or faint

    Contact your doctor immediately if any of these symptoms occur. Not so serious side effects, but bothersome and more likely to occur, are:

    • nausea
    • vomiting
    • constipation
    • loss of appetite
    • dizziness
    • headache
    • feeling tired
    • dry mouth
    • sweating
    • itching

    Talk to your doctor about ways to treat these symptoms.

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Oxycodone has been classified in Pregnancy Category B by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which means that when given to animals some birth defects were seen. However, studies in animals don't always accurately predict what will happen in humans and this drug was not studied specifically in women who were pregnant.

    Oxycodone can cause some problems during labor and delivery by reducing the strength, duration and frequency of uterine contractions, slowing down the delivery process. And if you are taking oxycodone in the last few weeks before delivery, it may cause the baby to have breathing problems and withdrawal symptoms after he or she is born.

    As with all drug use during pregnancy, the benefits should outweigh any risk to both you and your baby.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Oxycodone hydrochloride is a narcotic analgesic medication similar to morphine that is taken day and night when continuous long term pain relief is indicated. It is known by the brand name Oxycontin and comes in a time released tablet form. This medication is not used for mild short term pain or on an as needed basis. Oxycodone hydrochloride is typically not prescribed for pain following surgery, but can be used if you were taking it beforehand. Oxycodone Hydrochloride works by acting on the central nervous system to block moderate to severe pain. Oxycodone hydrochloride is available by prescription only.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered

    You might not be able to take oxycodone if you have low blood pressure, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or other breathing disorders, kidney disease, epilepsy or seizure disorders, mental illness or a history of drug abuse. Thyroid conditions, gallbladder disorders, disorders of your stomach or pancreas or intestines, adrenal disorders, urinary disorders, an enlarged prostate, history of head injury or brain tumor or curvature of the spine are all conditions that may keep you from taking oxycodone. Because oxycodone is metabolized by your liver, you may not be able to take it if you have liver disease.
     
    Anyone who is addicted to drugs or alcohol should not take oxycodone. The effects of oxycodone on an unborn baby are not known, so pregnant women should not take it unless absolutely necessary. Women who are breastfeeding should not take oxycodone because it can pass into breast milk and possibly harm a nursing baby.

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Maybe. Oxycodone is a potent narcotic with the potential for dependence. If you have been taking oxycodone for more than a few weeks and do become physically dependent, you may experience withdrawal symptoms if you stop suddenly. Your doctor might want to decrease your dose gradually so your body has time to adjust to being without the drug.

    Symptoms of oxycodone withdrawal
    • Mood changes such as anxiety, depression, irritability
    • Restlessness
    • Runny nose, tearing, sneezing
    • Flu-like symptoms such as sweating, chills, muscle or joint aches
    • Pains or weakness
    • Sleeping problems
    • Gastrointestinal problems such as cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
    • Changes in appetite
    • Rapid heartbeat
    • Difficulty breathing
    Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about physical dependence, tolerance or withdrawal symptoms while taking oxycodone.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Yes. Although physical dependence on oxycodone is possible, it is unlikely if the lowest dose is used and it is used correctly. Some people will develop a tolerance to the drug and need a higher dose to achieve the same level of pain control if they are taking the medicine for a long time.

    If you have been taking oxycodone for more than a few weeks and do become physically dependent you may experience withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking oxycodone suddenly, so your doctor may want to decrease your dose slowly.

    Talk to your doctor if you have any concerns about dependence, tolerance or withdrawal symptoms.

  • 2 Answers
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    A , Addiction Medicine, answered
    Many people become addicted due to having medical procedures, such as an operation, or due to some form of pain management need, such as back pain.  Physicians will typically treat the pain with a variety of pain medications that may include the analgesic oxycodone, which is a highly addictive opioid. Under these conditions, many people become medically addicted, and do so without any awareness that dependence has occurred until they try to stop its use. This is where a good patient to doctor communication will help to intervene with, what is often, a very subtle shift toward an addictive relationship with a drug over time.

    For instance, making your doctor aware that on some occasions you have begun taking the drug because you feel it positively impacts your mood, or simply makes you feel better emotionally, as opposed to using it for pain management, will be an extreme red flag to your physician. Such communications will underscore your chances of interventions by your physician that may decrease your potential for developing a primary substance use disorder, or becoming medically addicted.
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    You should know that oxycodone can be addictive and is a drug that has been abused. You will need to discontinue taking it gradually to avoid having withdrawal symptoms. Never let anyone else use your prescription of oxycodone. Take oxycodone with a full glass of water, and never take more than the prescribed amount. You should not drink alcohol while taking oxycodone because serious, even fatal reactions can occur when they are combined. Don't take other central nervous system (CNS) depressants while taking oxycodone, because side effects may increase dangerously when they are used together. Do not drive or operate machinery while taking oxycodone, because it can affect your thinking and judgment.
     
    Narcotics can cause you to become constipated, so ask your doctor if you need a stool softener. If you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or are breastfeeding, talk to your doctor before taking oxycodone. Tell your doctor if you have any other medical conditions. You might not be able to take oxycodone if you have low blood pressure, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or other breathing disorders, kidney disease, epilepsy or seizure disorders, mental illness or a history of drug abuse. Thyroid conditions, gallbladder disorders, disorders of your stomach or pancreas or intestines, adrenal disorders, urinary disorders, an enlarged prostate, history of head injury or brain tumor or curvature of the spine are all conditions that may keep you from taking oxycodone. Because oxycodone is metabolized by the liver, you may not be able to take it if you have liver disease.
     
    Do not take more oxycodone than your doctor has prescribed. Overdoses can be fatal. Overdose symptoms include: extreme drowsiness, pinpoint pupils, nausea, vomiting, dark urine, confusion, cold and clammy skin, muscle weakness, fainting, weak pulse, coma, blue lips, shallow breathing or no breathing. If you feel you or someone else has taken too much oxycodone, call 911 to get emergency help immediately.