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How serious is ovarian cancer?

Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancers in the United States. More than 22,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer annually and 14,000 women will lose their lives to it. Know your risk.

The most effective way a woman can protect herself against ovarian cancer is to become educated. Learn the signs and symptoms. Listen to your body. If these symptoms persist and they are unusual for you, see a healthcare professional to rule out the possibility of ovarian cancer.

Ovarian cancer can be very serious because the early symptoms are vague and may be attributed to other illnesses. Stage IA cancer has a five year survival rate of 94 percent. Eight out of 10 cases are not diagnosed until the cancer has become invasive or spread. Overall, the five year survival rate is under 50 percent. However, many treatments can help to prolong your life and improve quality of living if you have ovarian cancer.

Continue Learning about Ovarian Cancer

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.