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What's the genetic risk of developing ovarian cancer?

Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes account for approximately 10-15% of ovarian cancers. These mutations are most commonly found in families with a strong history of ovarian and/or breast cancer, and in Ashkenazi Jews. A woman can get these abnormal genes from one or both of her parents, and the mutation is present in every cell of the body, increasing her risk for both ovarian and breast cancer.

Women who have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation have a 15-40% lifetime risk of getting ovarian cancer, compared to women in the general population who have a 1.4% lifetime risk. Lynch Syndrome, an inherited genetic condition of mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 genes that greatly increases the risk of colon cancer, also increases the risk of ovarian cancer.

Scientists are currently investigating other gene mutations that may be responsible for increasing a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.