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What is an allograft?

An allograft is tissue that is transplanted from one person to another. The prefix allo comes from a Greek word meaning "other." (If tissue is moved from one place to another in your own body, it is called an autograft.) About 1,500,000 allografts are transplanted each year.
Allografts are tissues or organs that are transplanted between members of the same species, so a person-to-person transplant is an allograft. The three different types of allografts are: cadaveric, which is a transplant from a deceased individual; living related, which is a transplant from a relative of the recipient, and living unrelated, which is a transplant from a person who is not related to the recipient.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.