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How does anhydrous morphine interact with other medications or food?

Charles J. Sophy, MD
Adolescent Medicine

Anhydrous morphine, also known by the brand name Paregoric, is a prescription medication used to treat diarrhea. It is an opiate narcotic, which means it is derived from the seed pods of opium poppies. 

Anhydrous morphine works by reducing muscle activity in your stomach and bowels and decreasing the amount of fluid secreted by your intestines. As a result, a bowel movement moves more slowly through your intestines and more water is absorbed from the fecal matter, making the bowel movement more firm.

Before taking anhydrous morphine or paregoric, it is important to discuss all medications and supplements that you take regularly or occasionally with your doctor. 

Some medications might interact badly with anhydrous morphine. These include: allergy medications; antidepressants, particularly monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs); other anti-diarrheal medications; bladder or urinary medications, including darifenacin (Enablex), solifenacin (Vesicare), flavoxate (Urispas), tolterodine (Detrol), and oxybutynin (Ditropan and Oxytrol); benztropine (Cogentin); bronchodilators; cough and cold medications; dimenhydrinate (Dramamine); irritable bowel medications; metoclopramide (Reglan); muscle relaxants; naloxone (Narcan); naltrexone (ReVia); pain relievers; psychiatric medications; scopolamine (Transderm-Scop); sleeping pills; tranquilizers and sedatives; ulcer; and vitamin supplements.

Anhydrous morphine is not likely to interact with food, though it might affect your appetite or make you nauseous.

    Before taking anhydrous morphine, or Paregoric, it is important to discuss all medications and supplements that you take regularly or occasionally with your doctor.

    Some medications might interact negatively with anhydrous morphine. These include: allergy medications; antidepressants, particularly monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs); other antidiarrheal medications; bladder or urinary medications, including darifenacin (Enablex), solifenacin (Vesicare), flavoxate (Urispas), tolterodine (Detrol), oxybutynin (Ditropan and Oxytrol); benztropine (Cogentin); bronchodilators; cough and cold medications; dimenhydrinate (Dramamine); irritable bowel medications; metoclopramide (Reglan); muscle relaxants; naloxone (Narcan); naltrexone (ReVia); pain relievers; psychiatric medications; scopolamine (Transderm-Scop); sleeping pills; tranquilizers and sedatives; ulcer; and vitamin supplements.

    Anhydrous morphine is not likely to interact with food, though it might affect your appetite or make you nauseous.

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