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What foods contain gluten?

Margaret Floyd
Nutrition & Dietetics Specialist
Gluten is problematic in processed foods because it is so prevalent. Aside from wheat, rye, and barley, and the obvious products made from them, such as breads, pastas, cereals, baked goods, and beer, gluten hides in unlikely places such as salad dressings, gravies, and sauces (as a thickening agent), as well as seasonings, prepared meats, candies, chocolate bars, some nutritional supplements, medications, and beauty products.
Eat Naked: Unprocessed, Unpolluted, and Undressed Eating for a Healthier, Sexier You

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Eat Naked: Unprocessed, Unpolluted, and Undressed Eating for a Healthier, Sexier You

Eat Naked with Margaret Floyd for a Sexier You Are you fed up with counting calories? Confused by all the diet hype? Want to eat delicious, real food and look and feel great? Leading...
Dr. Donald J. Brust, MD
Gastroenterologist

Gluten is found in wheat, barley and rye, as well as many other common foods, medications and supplements.

Gluten is found in wheat, rye, barely, and any foods made with these grains.

These include:

  • White flour
  • Durum wheat
  • Graham flour
  • Triticale
  • Kamut
  • Semolina
  • Spelt
  • Wheat germ
  • Wheat bran

Foods that are usually made with wheat include:

  • Pasta
  • Couscous
  • Bread
  • Flour tortillas
  • Cookies
  • Cakes
  • Muffins
  • Pastries
  • Cereal
  • Crackers
  • Beer
  • Oats
  • Gravy
  • Dressings
  • Sauces

This may seem like a long list, but there are gluten-free versions of these foods available in most grocery stores. You just have to look for them!

You may not expect it, but the following foods can also contain gluten:

  • Broth in soups and bouillon cubes
  • Breadcrumbs and croutons
  • Fried foods
  • Imitation fish
  • Lunch meats and hot dogs
  • Matzo
  • Most chips and candy
  • Salad dressings
  • Self-basting turkey
  • Soy sauce
  • Rice and pasta mixes

Always be sure to check nutrition labels for gluten-containing ingredients and additives.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.