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How Eating Green Helps Prevent Colon Cancer

How Eating Green Helps Prevent Colon Cancer

Eating broccoli, kale, collards and other cruciferous plants may help you prevent colon cancer.

Gang Green Nation is fan-central for the New York Jets football team. But since gangrene is also the name for limb-threatening cell death, fans may have been better off calling their group Jolly Green Giants (or Jets)—after all fresh, frozen and canned vegetables are the real winners. The Jets had 5 wins and 11 losses last year, slightly better than Dr. Mike’s beloved Browns, who had a perfect season—0 wins, 16 losses.

In fact, your front line of defense against inflammation and colon cancer turns out to be from the giants of green veggies—broccoli, kale, collards and other cruciferous plants.

Researchers in London have found a couple of health-promoting chemical building blocks contained in those powerful veggie-defenders. And they’re released in your guts when you digest the above-mentioned nutritional linemen and their teammates cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts. Once let loose to play in your intestinal tract, they help create a team that encourages your body to regulate inflammation and modulate immune cell activity.

The researchers were amazed to find that when these veggies were fed to mice, they not only prevented colon cancer, but in mice that had colon cancer, they reduced the number and size of tumors and made some of them benign.

So, do you need another reason to make a healthy serving of these defensive players a big part of your daily diet? Enjoy munching on these Green Giants (dip them in chickpea humus) when watching football for a healthy, delicious snack.

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