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What are the side effects of piroxicam?

Common side effects of piroxicam include: nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, gas, headaches, heartburn, and upset stomach. Alcohol and other medications can increase the risk for dizziness and drowsiness. You should not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how piroxicam affects you. Piroxicam increases your risk for a heart attack, stroke and bleeding stomach ulcers, which can be fatal. Long-term use, smoking and drinking increase your risk for these serious side effects. If you experience signs of an allergic reaction to piroxicam, such as swelling, hives or itching, call your doctor.  If you have difficulty breathing, call 911. You should talk to your doctor if you experience any of these serious side effects: a change in urine and dark stools; irregular heartbeat; fever, chills and sore throat; numbness in the arm or leg or persistent weakness on one side of the body; red, swollen, blistered or peeling skin; unexpected bruising and bleeding; unusual joint or muscle pain; change in vision or speech; and yellowing of the skin or eyes. Piroxicam can interfere with ovulation in women, possibly causing temporary infertility. Normal fertility returns after the medication is stopped, but if you're having difficulty getting pregnany, ask your doctor if you should stop piroxicam. Piroxicam may cause unexpected side effects that are not described above. If you experience an unanticipated reaction while taking piroxicam, talk to your doctor.
 

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.