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What should I know about diclofenac-misoprostol before taking it?

Before taking diclofenac-misoprostol, you should know that it is a pregnancy Category X drug, meaning that it should not be taken during pregnancy as it can cause serious harm to a fetus. Women should use two types of birth control to prevent pregnancy while taking this medication. You should not take ketorolac, pentoxifylline, cidofovir, methotrexate or pemetrexed while taking diclofenac-misoprostol, as it may negatively interact with diclofenac-misoprostol. You should also tell your doctor if you're taking antacids, phenobarbital, aspirin or similar medications, blood-thinners, cyclosporine, digoxin, high blood pressure medications, diabetes medications, diuretics or lithium, as they may interact with the drug. Alert your doctor if you've previously had allergies to diclofenac, aspirin, other NSAIDs, misoprostol or other drugs or dyes, as these may prevent you from taking this medication. If you are over 60 and taking steroids or blood thinners, have had an ulcer before or if you smoke or drink regularly, you are at increased risk of internal bleeding. This medication may also increase risk for stroke and heart attack, especially among those with a pre-existing heart condition. If you have asthma that is sensitive to aspirin, previous allergic reactions, stomach ulcers, kidney or liver or heart disease or have had coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) within the past 14 days, you also may be at increased risk for complications.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.