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What increases my risk for non-small cell cancer?

The one thing that will seriously increase your risk for non-small cell cancer is smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke - approximately 85% of all lung cancer cases are due to smoking.

Although it is not known exactly what else increases your risk for lung cancer, there are a few likely candidates. Some additional risk factors are if you have a family history of lung cancer or if you drink excessively. Exposure to certain cancer-causing chemicals such as radon, asbestos, mustard gas, cigar smoke, and radiation can also increase your risk for non-small cell cancer. Rarely, people who have had other lung problems, like tuberculosis, may also be at a higher risk for non-small cell lung cancer.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.