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What should I know before using onabotulinumtoxina?

It is possible for onabotulinumtoxinA to spread from the treated area, causing symptoms of botulism. Before taking onabotulinumtoxinA you must discuss any previous onabotulinumtoxinA or other botulinum toxin treatments you've had, including any possible allergic reactions, with your doctor. You cannot be treated in an area that is showing any signs of infection or swelling and you should not see more than one  doctor to receive additional doses of onabotulinumtoxinA. Use of onabotulinumtoxinA may cause physical weakness or difficulty with depth perception and vision, which could prove dangerous in some settings such as driving. If you have had side effects from previous surgeries, especially those on the face or involving the eyes, or if you have heart disease, hyperthyroidism, seizures or any unusual  bleeding, you need to be sure your doctor is aware of those issues before using onabotulinumtoxinA. Be sure that once treatment starts with onabotulinumtoxinA, you keep other doctors and dentists informed that you are using it. You may not be able to receive treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA if you have or have had certain conditions, including asthma, emphysema, Lambert-Eaton syndrome, Lou Gehrig's disease, myasthenia gravis, swallowing problems or weakness in the facial muscles. Women should discuss possible complications with pregnancy before using onabotulinumtoxinA. In addition to other botulinum toxins, you should talk to your doctor about any cold or allergy medications you may be taking and any muscle relaxants or sleep aids you use. Some of the specific drugs that could have negative interactions with onabotulinumtoxinA include the following: amikacin, clindamycin, colistimethate, donepezil, galantamine, gentamicin, kanamycin, lincomycin, magnesium sulfate,  neomycin, neostigmine, physostigmine, polymyxin, pyridostigmine, quinidine, rimabotulinumtoxinB, rivastigmine, streptomycin, and tobramycin. If you take any over-the-counter medications, vitamins or herbal supplements be sure to discuss them with your doctor.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.