Advertisement

What should I know about colchicine before taking it?

Colchicine prevents and treats the inflammation associated with gout attacks. Colchicine tablets are sometimes used for other approved or off-label treatment or other diseases, including familial Mediterranean fever, amyloidosis, sarcoid arthritis, cirrhosis of the liver, pseudogout, Behcet's syndrome and pericarditis. However, not everyone should take colchicine. Talk to your doctor if you suffer from severe liver disease, stomach problems or severe kidney disease. Because colchicine is processed through the kidneys, it may not be an appropriate treatment for people with kidney disease or elderly people, whose kidney function may have naturally declined with age. Colchicine is not recommended for pregnant women and nursing mothers should first talk to their doctors before taking colchicine. It should not be taken with atazanavir, clarithromycin, darunavir, indinavir, itraconazole, ketoconazole, lopinavir, nefazodone, nelfinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir, telithromycin and tipranavir. Talk to your doctor about all medications you are taking, as some medications may interact with colchicine or reduce its effectiveness. Colchicine also should not be taken with alcohol or grapefruit juice.

Continue Learning about Muscoloskeletal Agent

What are the side effects of leflunomide?
Donna Hill Howes, RNDonna Hill Howes, RN
Side effects may include high blood pressure, dizziness, hair loss, respiratory tract infections, br...
More Answers
How does leflunomide interact with other medications and foods?
Donna Hill Howes, RNDonna Hill Howes, RN
People taking leflunomide should avoid receiving live vaccines. If you are taking an immunosuppress...
More Answers
What should I know about baclofen before taking it?
Donna Hill Howes, RNDonna Hill Howes, RN
If you take baclofen, you should avoid alcohol. If you have impaired kidney function, baclofen may ...
More Answers
Does teriflunomide interact with any other medications?
Donna Hill Howes, RNDonna Hill Howes, RN
If you are taking denosumab, teriflunomide may not be a good option for you. If you are taking fing...
More Answers

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.