Advertisement

Is there a cure for multiple sclerosis?

Dr. Jeanne Morrison, PhD
Family Practitioner

Multiple sclerosis, or MS, is not curable. The cause of the disease has not yet been determined and without a known cause, it is hard to cure. The good news is while MS can cause a wide range of symptoms, it is not life threatening. There are many treatment options available to help you manage the disease and ease pain.

There is no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS), but scientists and researchers around the world are working diligently to decipher the complexities of this disease. There are injectable treatments designed to reduce the frequency of attacks and delay the progression of disability. There are also many medications available to treat the symptoms of the disease.

Dr. Mehmet Oz, MD
Cardiologist (Heart Specialist)

There is no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS); however, medications that are available can slow down the course of the disease. Therapies can treat specific symptoms of MS, such as pain, bladder problems, fatigue or weakness. Everyone with MS should see a doctor who is knowledgeable about MS and who can recommend a comprehensive approach to managing MS, which includes medications, mental health support and lifestyle modifications.

This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com.

Dr. Louis Rosner
Neurologist

Currently, there is no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS). At this point in research, we have money and we have talent. We can always use more of each, but with persistence, good observation and serendipity, we'll have a cure for multiple sclerosis (MS) in the near future. MS research involves many different experts in neurology, virology, immunology, epidemiology and genetics. There is no one scientist who is an expert in all these fields, and, unfortunately, no one is coordinating all the scientific thought. The questions must be tackled from all their different angles, but eventually someone will have to merge all the information. At this point in research, we have money and we have talent. We can always use more of each, but with persistence, good observation, and serendipity, we'll have a cure for multiple sclerosis (MS) in the near future.

Multiple Sclerosis

More About this Book

Multiple Sclerosis

Too often, multiple sclerosis is thought of only as "the crippler of young adults." But in fact, 75 percent of all people with MS will never need a wheelchair. In Multiple Sclerosis, Dr. Louis J....

There is no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS), but there are medications that may reduce disease activity, reduce frequency of relapses and delay physical disability in people with MS. Many aspects of MS can be effectively managed with medications. Also, physical and occupational therapy (rehabilitation) may help improve impaired functions. Counseling may have a positive effect on the psychological toll the disease takes on a person and her family.

This content originally appeared on HealthyWomen.org.

Continue Learning about Multiple Sclerosis Treatment

Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis and MS Therapies
Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis and MS Therapies
Multiple sclerosis is a progressive disease that requires ongoing treatment. Watch neurologist Doug Stuart, MD, from the MS Center of Atlanta, explain...
Read More
How are severe cases of spasticity treated in multiple sclerosis (MS)?
Multiple Sclerosis FoundationMultiple Sclerosis Foundation
Treatment for spasticity—abnormal muscle tone—in multiple sclerosis (MS) is a stretching program, wh...
More Answers
Where can I get help paying for my multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment?
Multiple Sclerosis FoundationMultiple Sclerosis Foundation
The demand for assistance paying for MS disease-modifying treatments is "off the charts" at the ...
More Answers
Are Sleep Disorders Common Among MS Patients?
Are Sleep Disorders Common Among MS Patients?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.