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How is relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) treated?

Eighty-five percent of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) are originally diagnosed with a relapsing-remitting course of the disease (RRMS). Characterized by a pattern of attacks followed by remissions, RRMS is often treated with first line disease-modifying drugs such as Avonex, Betaseron, Copaxone, and Rebif (which are frequently referred to as the ABCR drugs), or with Tysabri. There is a growing consensus that treatment should begin as soon as possible after a diagnosis of RRMS and that the therapy should continue indefinitely, except in the event of a clear lack of benefit, intolerable adverse effects, new data, or better therapies.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.