Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms
Symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) vary from patient to patient. Central neuropathic pain, a constant burning sensation affecting the limbs, is the most common pain symptom among sufferers. Poor digestion is another frequent complaint. Check out our expert answers to learn more, including the best ways to manage your MS symptoms.

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    Multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue can be unpredictable. The fatigue may be short or long in duration. You may experience fatigue that worsens as the day goes on or it can come on quite suddenly, preventing you from finishing a task that you are right in the middle of completing. This type of fatigue is sometimes called lassitude. MS fatigue can be physical, emerging after a short walk in which your leg becomes weaker and eventually starts to drag, or when performing a repetitive motion, the extremity you are using just gives out unexpectedly. MS fatigue can also be mental, making it difficult for you to concentrate and stick to a mental task. Unfortunately, these types of scenarios make fatigue the number one cause of unemployment in MS.
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    A , Neurology, answered
    Is poor digestion a common complaint among MS patients?
    Poor digestion is one of the most common multiple sclerosis symptoms. In this WisePatient video, I will explain the link between digestive issues and chronic diseases like MS.
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    Myokymia is an annoying twitching or fluttering of the eyelid muscles. It may come and go in many people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Vision itself is not actually affected. Myokymia can be seen in some people without MS as well. Stress, sleep deprivation, and caffeine may make it act up in some.
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    Lymphedema is usually painless. For people with multiple sclerosis (MS), there may be a tight feeling in the skin of the feet and ankles, and it may thicken and become fibrous. Swelling may make it difficult to wear shoes and further hinder mobility, interfering with daily activities. Rising summertime temperatures may exacerbate the problem since blood vessels and lymph channels dilate more in the heat.
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    A Neurology, answered on behalf of
    What role does stress play in multiple sclerosis?
    Even if stress doesn't have a direct affect on MS, taking steps to reduce stress can improve qualty of life, says neurologist Charles Smith, MD. In this video, he explains why maintaining a positive attitude can improve your health.
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    Talk to the neurologist who is treating your multiple sclerosis (MS) and let them know if you are having migraines. This advice is crucial because sometimes neurologists, nurse practitioners and medical assistants may become focused on your immunological status, relapses, walking and multitude of other symptoms associated with MS.

    In one research trial, researchers looked at how often different practitioners were diagnosing people with MS with migraines. At the first analysis, there were surprisingly fewer people with MS who had migraines than in the rest of the population. When the researchers looked more carefully, however, they found that it made a difference who was seeing the people with MS. The MS specialist reported just as many people with MS had migraines as people without MS, but the general neurologist and nurse practitioner in this study only had two people with migraines (out of over 200 people with MS)! It seems unlikely that completely different types of people with MS were going to see these different practitioners. Instead, it seems that when your healthcare practitioner is less comfortable with your MS, then they may not take the extra steps to deal with all of your symptoms and other neurological conditions impacting your life.

    The job of medical educators is to help improve the knowledge of doctors and other health care practitioners about both MS and migraine, but your help is needed also. Go to your office visits with a list of issues that are troubling you -- and if migraines are on that list, then please make sure to bring the topic up.
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    A , Neurology, answered

    A description of the clinical picture of multiple sclerosis (MS) includes symptoms, the patient's complaints, and signs, what the doctor finds in an examination, such as a change in the knee-jerk reflex test. Together, they are called "findings" and are the principal clues to accurate diagnosis and eventual prognosis.

    Symptoms and signs are most commonly believed to be the result of MS lesions causing disturbances in electrical conduction in one or more of three general sites in the central nervous system - the optic nerve, the brain stem-cerebellum, and the spinal cord. As each area controls particular functions of the central nervous system, the location of the lesion will determine the type of attack. For example, an optic nerve lesion may cause blurred vision, blind spots, or a decrease in brightness. A brain stem-cerebellar lesion can cause dizziness or double vision or balance and coordination trouble. Spinal cord lesions give rise to symptoms such as weakness or numbness of the limbs. Occasionally, signs and symptoms are caused by lesions in a fourth area, the cerebrum. This area, however, remains something of a puzzle.

    Although the pathological lesions of MS are very common there, cerebral signs and symptoms are relatively rare. This discrepancy between lesions and clinical signs and symptoms is one of the great curiosities of MS; many, possibly most, MS plaques are "silent." In fact, a January 1986 study at the Neurologic Institute of the Millard Fillmore Hospital in Buffalo, New York, found that 75 percent of all lesions were "clinically silent."

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    Experienced by 75-95 percent of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), fatigue is the most commonly reported symptom associated with the disease. Approximately 50-60 percent describe fatigue as their most disabling symptom, regardless of their disease course or level of ability.
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    Try this exercise if you have dysarthria, a term used to describe a group of speech disturbances related to muscular control in the speech mechanism. Take a deep breath, open your mouth wide and say “Ahh” for as long and loud as you can until you have no more air left in your lungs. On average, men should be able to sustain “Ahh” for 20 to 40 seconds, while women should be able to sustain “Ahh” for 15 to 35 seconds. This deceptively effective exercise increases breath support, improves control over expiratory intercostal muscles and improves vocal volume and intelligibility (speech clarity).
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    Muscle weakness can occur in multiple sclerosis (MS) as a result of slowing or loss of nerve impulse conduction. It may also evolve from disuse, especially if lifestyle changes have made an individual more sedentary. Weakness contributes not only to mobility complications, but also to safety hazards. For instance, foot drop is common in MS and can cause abnormal walking patterns, placing strain on muscles and joints that are not meant for walking. This can result in pain syndromes and create a risk of falling.