Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms
Symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) vary from patient to patient. Central neuropathic pain, a constant burning sensation affecting the limbs, is the most common pain symptom among sufferers. Poor digestion is another frequent complaint. Check out our expert answers to learn more, including the best ways to manage your MS symptoms.

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    Optic nerve attack, also known as optic neuritis, is a common symptom of Multiple Sclerosis (MS).  It is the first attack leading to a diagosis of MS in 20% of cases and can occur in up to 40% of patients with known MS. 
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    Similar to the physical fatigue many individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience, cognitive fatigue can also be present. Research shows that persons with MS can easily experience fatigue when engaging in mentally challenging work and tasks that require focused attention. Once fatigued, individuals with MS tend to make errors in their written and verbal communication skills.
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    Aphasia, or the loss of words, until recently was not considered a clinical manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS) because MS primarily affects the white matter of the brain and spinal cord, while aphasia is typically associated with diseases of the grey matter. However, a recent multi-center study investigating the prevalence of aphasia in MS found that nearly 40% of individuals with MS demonstrate markedly reduced word-finding skills. Aphasic disorders may be observed in two different situations in MS. The most common situation is experiencing difficulty generating the names of people, places and things over the disease course, while the second situation is experiencing acute aphasia during or following an exacerbation.
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    As many as 40 percent of people who are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) will face speech difficulties at some time. The most common problems are loudness, a harsh quality to the voice, and problems with articulation and pitch.

    The symptom could hit hard with a relapse, or come and go several times a day on a regular basis. It might be so subtle that your spouse or doctor notices it before you do, or so frustrating that you don't want to leave the house.
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    A , Neurology, answered
    There is no question that multiple sclerosis (MS) has a specific age of onset when symptoms first appear. MS rarely strikes before age ten or after age fifty, and symptoms generally appear between ages twenty and forty. Statistically, the average age of onset is twenty-eight, and the average age of diagnosis is thirty-three. (The average age of onset is slightly lower for women than men.)

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    For someone with multiple sclerosis (MS), speech and swallowing problems can come as a package. Because similar muscles are involved, if you are having problems speaking, you might also notice difficulty swallowing, a symptom known as dysphagia. Swallowing can be delayed or ineffective. You might cough or choke. In some cases, food or liquid could end up in the lungs, a serious condition known as aspiration.
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    Urinary urgency is a very common primary symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). It can be caused by a bladder that is triggered to empty even if a very small amount of urine is present, or a bladder that overfills and does not empty completely. When the bladder fails to empty, the remaining urine, called residual, can cause an infection.

    The urinary tract infection (UTI) that can result is a secondary symptom or complication of urgency related to urinary retention. UTI symptoms include: pain or pressure over the bladder or in the groin, pain when urinating, increased urgency and frequency, a strong odor to the urine, increased fatigue, fever, and chills.
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    Difficulty with walking (gait) is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). There are many causes of gait issues, including muscle weakness, foot drop, muscle spasms, balance difficulty, loss of sensation and fatigue. If you have difficulty walking, your neurologist will try to identify the cause and will accordingly pick the treatment that is best for you.

    Foot drop is a relatively common cause of gait disturbances in people with MS. It can have a severe impact on a person’s ability to walk and can cause serious falls. Foot drop may occur during a relapse and get better with time, or it may become permanent. In either case, there are a few treatments to help manage it.

    Interventions including physical therapy, braces, functional electrical stimulation (FES) and the drug Ampyra have been shown to help improve symptoms and the quality of life of those who experience foot drop. 
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    A , Neurology, answered

    Hand Tremor and Incoordination becomes apparent when the arm or hand performs actions in a clumsy fashion, sometimes with shaking, slowness, poor rhythm, or an inability to control speed or accuracy of movement. This problem also occurs with the legs and feet, but it is more serious when it involves the hand - greater coordination is required for daily chores like buttoning a sweater or cracking an egg.

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    Human speech ends with the mouth but starts with the brain. The lungs, vocal cords and tongue all play a role, as well as the lips, throat and jaw. That leaves several places along the way that speaking can get complicated when multiple sclerosis (MS) is involved.

    “When there is damage to the nerves that stimulate the muscles, they may not work as quickly or precisely,” according to Bonnie Schaude, outpatient speech pathologist at the MS Institute at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta, Ga.

    Speech symptoms with MS aren't about not knowing the right word, even though some people also could have speaking difficulties linked to cognitive issues.

    Sometimes problems talking might be a side effect from medications, particularly those that cause a dry mouth. But more often, just as when MS hinders mobility, the muscles you use to speak simply aren't getting the message.

    In addition, those same symptoms that play havoc with other parts of the body can show up in speech. Ataxia, muscle weakness and tremor all can come into play.