Advertisement

What is a pseudo-exacerbation in multiple sclerosis (MS)?

A virus can cause old multiple sclerosis (MS) symptoms to resurface and make you feel like you are in an exacerbation. This is commonly called a "pseudo-exacerbation." In the hospital, we often see older people without MS who look like they are having a stroke, when all they have is a urinary tract infection. The same is true with MS patients who may look like they are having an exacerbation (relapse) but are really not. Sometimes, you may notice that older MS symptoms seem to resurface when you are tired or overheated. This also does not mean you are having an MS relapse. You may be experiencing Uhtoff's phenomenon, where heat causes older MS symptoms to resurface. A true MS relapse usually lasts for weeks to months before improving.

Continue Learning about Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

9 Things You Might Bring to Your Next MS Infusion Session
9 Things You Might Bring to Your Next MS Infusion Session
Infusion therapy is a method of delivering medication via an intravenous catheter, more commonly known as an IV. There are a number of medications use...
Read More
What should I ask my doctor when discussing multiple sclerosis (MS)?
HealthyWomenHealthyWomen
When discussing multiple sclerosis (MS) with your doctor you should ask the following questions:  ...
More Answers
Best (and Worst) Foods for Multiple Sclerosis
Best (and Worst) Foods for Multiple SclerosisBest (and Worst) Foods for Multiple SclerosisBest (and Worst) Foods for Multiple SclerosisBest (and Worst) Foods for Multiple Sclerosis
Restore energy and help ease symptoms with these eats.
Start Slideshow
Do You Also Treat Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms?
Do You Also Treat Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.