Advertisement

What is benign multiple sclerosis?

MSF ADMIN
Administration Specialist
Benign multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by mild or no disability, full neurological function, and very few relapses after 15 years of disease onset. Of those with relapse-remitting MS, which is characterized by clearly defined acute attacks, 5 to 20 percent may be classified as having a benign disease course.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that affects the nervous system. In a healthy body, nerves are surrounded by a protective layer of fatty tissue called the myelin sheath. If you have MS, that fatty layer is irreversibly damaged by an unknown cause. This makes it harder for your nerves to transmit impulses between your brain, eyes and spinal cord, causing a range of symptoms.

Benign multiple sclerosis (MS) is a mild form of MS. In this form, symptoms can completely clear up during remissions and the disease doesn't progress much, even after 15 years.

Benign MS affects your body the same way any other form of MS would. It damages the protective layer that surrounds your nerves called the myelin sheath. After the myelin sheath is damaged, it's harder for the nerves to transmit signals throughout the body. That's why there are so many symptoms associated with MS. An impulse traveling on a nerve could be altered at any point where that nerve is exposed causing a different reaction than the one that was originally intended. It is unclear why benign MS has milder symptoms, but recent studies have shown that people suffering from this type of MS have fewer lesions and less inflammation in parts of the brain commonly affected by those with other forms of MS.

Continue Learning about Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Fatigued by MS? It Could Be Sleep Apnea
Fatigued by MS? It Could Be Sleep Apnea
Almost everyone who has multiple sclerosis (MS) battles with a crushing sense of fatigue. Arms and legs can feel heavy, and it can be difficult to car...
Read More
Is it better not to know if one has multiple sclerosis (MS)?
Louis RosnerLouis Rosner
The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is helping doctors zero in on more definite multiple sclerosis ...
More Answers
Best (and Worst) Foods for Multiple Sclerosis
Best (and Worst) Foods for Multiple SclerosisBest (and Worst) Foods for Multiple SclerosisBest (and Worst) Foods for Multiple SclerosisBest (and Worst) Foods for Multiple Sclerosis
Restore energy and help ease symptoms with these eats.
Start Slideshow
Can Lifestyle Changes Slow the Progression of Multiple Sclerosis?
Can Lifestyle Changes Slow the Progression of Multiple Sclerosis?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.