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How is restless legs syndrome treated in people with multiple sclerosis?

Restless leg syndrome (RLS)—a neurological condition that causes the irresistible urge to move the legs—affects one in ten adults in the U.S. Interestingly, data suggest that individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) are three times more likely than the general population to experience RLS. Cervical cord damage is a significant predictor for the co-occurrence of these conditions. The urge to move, which is sensory in nature, can be described as a crawling, creeping, tingling or burning feeling.

Moving the affected limb(s) somewhat eases the symptoms of restless leg syndrome (RLS) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), but only for a short time. Fortunately, medications, such as Requip, are available to treat RLS. If the symptoms of RLS are severe, a low dose of central nervous system depressants or anticonvulsants may be prescribed. In some instances, non-drug measures can help relieve symptoms.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.