Mouth-Body Connection

Mouth-Body Connection

Mouth-Body Connection
Oral hygiene is directly connected to overall health, both reflecting and affecting it. Poor oral hygiene can lead to caries, halitosis, abscess and heart disease, and bacteria in your mouth can travel to the rest of your body and cause serious complications.

Recently Answered

  • 2 Answers
    A
    Hormonal changes during pregnancy affect a woman's oral health. 

    For example, some women develop a condition known as “pregnancy gingivitis,” an inflammation of the gums that can cause swelling and tenderness. Your gums also may bleed a little when you brush or floss. Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to more serious forms of gum disease. Your dentist may recommend more frequent cleanings to prevent this.
    Your dentist can consult with your physician to determine the drugs, such as painkillers or antibiotics; you may safely take during the pregnancy.

    In some women, overgrowths of tissue called “pregnancy tumors” appear on the gums, most often during the second trimester. These non-cancerous growths or swellings are usually found between the teeth and are believed to be related to excess plaque.
     
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Eating disorders can definitely affect your teen's oral health. Without the proper nutrition, gums and other soft tissue inside the mouth may bleed more easily and the glands that produce saliva may swell. If your teen suffers from bulimia, throwing up frequently can also affect the teeth because when strong stomach acid repeatedly flow, enamel can be lost to the point that the teeth change in color, shape and length. The edges of teeth become thin and/or break off easily. Eating hot or cold food or drink may become uncomfortable.

    If you suspect your teen has an eating disorder, talk to his or her physician. You should also seek guidance from health professionals trained in eating disorders and consider contacting the National Eating Disorders Associations for information on how to support your child.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Studies indicate that severe gum disease may be associated with several other health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes or stroke. However, saying that two conditions are associated is not the same as saying that one causes the other. It only means that some studies have shown that more people with gum disease experience one of the conditions mentioned above than people without gum disease. This finding could be the result of another factor, like smoking. For example, people who smoke are at higher risk for heart disease, stroke and cancer as well as gum disease. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to establish whether a cause-and-effect relationship exists and to determine if, or how, treating gum disease may affect your overall health.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    The answer is yes, however the risk is low. If you are taking antiresorptive agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, you typically do not need to avoid or postpone dental treatment. The risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw is very low. However, 10 percent of people with ONJ are taking these medications for treatment of osteoporosis. It may be beneficial for anyone who will be starting osteoporosis treatment with antiresorptive agents to see their dentist before beginning treatment or shortly after. This way, you and your dentist can ensure that you have good oral health going into treatment and develop a plan that will keep your mouth healthy during treatment.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics, answered
    Those who may be a good candidate for orthognathic surgery usually have misaligned jaws, bite problems, and their face may be off balance. Due to these problems with the jaw, they may have difficulty eating, as well as speaking. But the re-shaping of the face through the orthognathic surgery can address all these issues at the same time. It even reaches people on a deeper level, giving them the confidence and comfort of which they have most likely always fell short.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A answered

    Research suggests that women who are taking infertility treatments may have more gingivitis and bleeding of the gums compared to women who do not take infertility treatments. Researchers think that the higher levels of progesterone and estrogen are linked to this, since gum tissue contains "high-affinity" estrogen receptors.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A answered

    Birth control pills, or oral contraceptives, may increase inflammation of the gums. Past research, however, measured oral contraceptives that used much higher hormone doses, so it is possible that today's oral contraceptives may not have as much effect.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 3 Answers
    A
    There are a number of health problems associated with gum disease, an infection of the tissues that support your teeth. The two major oral problems associated with gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis is a milder and reversible form of periodontal disease that only affects the gums. It may lead to more serious, destructive forms of periodontal disease called periodontitis, which can seriously damage the gums and bone that support the teeth causing them to become loose, fall out or need to be removed by a dentist.

    Here are some of the warning signs that you have gum disease:
    • Gums that bleed easily
    • Red, swollen, tender gums
    • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth
    • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
    • Permanent teeth that are loose or separating
    • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
    • Any change in the fit of partial dentures
    Here are some factors that increase the risk of developing periodontal disease:
    • Tobacco smoking or chewing
    • Systemic diseases such as diabetes
    • Some types of medication such as steroids, some types of anti-epilepsy drugs, cancer therapy drugs, some calcium channel blockers and oral contraceptives
    • Bridges that no longer fit properly
    • Crooked teeth
    • Fillings that have become defective
    • Pregnancy or use of oral contraceptives
    It is possible to have gum disease and not have any warning signs. That is one reason why regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are very important. Treatment methods depend upon the type of disease and how far the condition has progressed.

    Good oral hygiene at home is essential to help keeping gum disease from becoming more serious or recurring. Brush, clean between your teeth, eat a balanced diet, and schedule regular dental visits for a lifetime of healthy smiles.
    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered

    Depression can lead to poor self-care, Women with depression are less likely to care for their oral health. Women with symptoms of depression should seek treatment from a qualified medical professional.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered

    Research suggests that young women who experience changes in the hormones estrogen and progesterone may experience changes in their gums. This is especially true during puberty when these hormones are fluctuating. During puberty, young women may experience gum inflammation. As long as you are brushing, flossing, and visiting your dentist routinely, you may not have any higher risk of developing periodontal disease. Over time, you may find that the irritation and inflammation decreases as your body adjusts to these hormonal changes. Symptoms may return to some degree during your period.