Mouth-Body Connection

Mouth-Body Connection

Mouth-Body Connection
Oral hygiene is directly connected to overall health, both reflecting and affecting it. Poor oral hygiene can lead to caries, halitosis, abscess and heart disease, and bacteria in your mouth can travel to the rest of your body and cause serious complications.

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    While obesity can trigger other health problems that impact oral health, it is more likely not eating a well-balanced diet that has the greatest impact.

    Foods that contain sugars of any kind can contribute to tooth decay. To control the amount of sugar you eat, read the nutrition facts and ingredient labels on foods and beverages and choose options that are lowest in sugar. Common sources of sugar in the diet include soft drinks, candy, cookies and pastries.

    Your physician or a registered dietitian can also provide suggestions for eating a nutritious diet. If your diet lacks certain nutrients, it may be more difficult for tissues in your mouth to resist infection. This may contribute to gum disease. Severe gum disease is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Many researchers believe that the disease progresses faster and is potentially more severe in people with poor nutrition.
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    Young, adult, or elderly women with an overactive thyroid might be at increased risk for periodontal disease and other complications.

    Adults with an underactive thyroid might have problems with wound healing or differences in taste.
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    It is important to practice good oral health care hygiene, as your mouth is the window to your whole body. Not doing so can lead to oral health problems but also impacts your overall health. For example there is an association between gum disease and heart disease. 

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    An abnormal bite or teeth that are missing or crooked can lead to teeth grinding, or bruxism. And doing so can lead to:

    • dull headaches
    • jaw soreness
    • teeth that are painful or loose
    • fractured teeth
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    Your dentist should be told you an eating disorder. Eating disorders can cause widespread damage to the teeth and can quicken tooth decay and tooth loss. Dentists know how to help protect your teeth from further erosion, prevent periodontal disease and tooth loss, and get you back on track.

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    The mouth is a window into the health of the body. It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies or general infection. For example, systemic diseases -- those that affect the entire body, such as diabetes, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and Sjogren's syndrome -- may first become apparent because of mouth lesions or other oral problems.

    The mouth is filled with countless bacteria, some linked to tooth decay and gum disease. Researchers have found that periodontitis (the advanced form of periodontal disease that can cause tooth loss) is linked with other health problems, such as cardiovascular disease, stroke and bacterial pneumonia. Likewise, pregnant women with periodontitis may be at increased risk of delivering preterm and/or low-birth-weight infants.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Floss and brush daily. Gingivitis and periodontal disease cause aging of the immune and arterial systems. We do not know exactly why gum disease causes aging, but we do know with certainty that it does. For example, a 55-year-old man free of periodontal disease has a RealAge (physiologic age) that is 2 years younger than his peer who has gingivitis, and 4 years younger than his peer who has full-blown periodontal disease. See a dental professional every six months, or more often if advised to do so, to have your gums checked and cared for. Regular professional dental and dental hygienist care is also necessary to prevent gingivitis and periodontal disease.
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    A , Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics, answered
    Prior to getting the orthognathic surgery, patients are fitted with braces. The step of getting braces is important in making sure that the teeth will fit together properly after the surgery has been performed. During this phase, the teeth are being moved, and it may seem as though the bite is getting worse. For those who don’t want to have to wear metal braces, there are clear options that exist.

    Recovery time is minimal, considering the amount of change that is taking place. Typically, people are able to go back to work and school a week after the surgery: however, they are usually advised not to work out or do any jogging for about three months following. There will also be a temporary shift in what the person eats, as orthognathic patients usually have to eat softer foods for the first few weeks to provide maximum comfort.
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    Some oral health problems can be serious. Diseases that affect the tissue supporting your teeth can be mild or severe. If untreated the more mild form (gingivitis) can turn more severe and can be destructive, leading to loss of teeth. Use of tobacco products can lead to increased risk for oral cancer, which can cause pain, difficulty chewing, swallowing, speaking or moving the jaw or tongue. Not brushing and flossing regularly can lead to cavities, requiring fillings or other problems. Your dentist can help prevent problems from occurring and catch those that do occur while they are easy to treat.
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    Oral health problems are caused primarily by not brushing twice daily and flossing once daily. Maintaining a healthy diet is also important. If your diet lacks certain nutrients, it may be more difficult for tissues in your mouth to resist infection. Visit your dentist regularly. Your dentist can help prevent problems from occurring and catch those that do occur while they are easy to treat.
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