Mouth-Body Connection

Mouth-Body Connection

Mouth-Body Connection
Oral hygiene is directly connected to overall health, both reflecting and affecting it. Poor oral hygiene can lead to caries, halitosis, abscess and heart disease, and bacteria in your mouth can travel to the rest of your body and cause serious complications.

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    There is no conclusive research showing that gum disease causes cancer. Studies indicate that severe gum disease may be associated with several other health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes or stroke. However, saying that two conditions are associated is not the same as saying that one causes the other. It only means that some studies have shown that more people with gum disease experience one of the conditions mentioned above than people without gum disease. This finding could be the result of another factor, like smoking. For example, people who smoke are at higher risk for heart disease, stroke and cancer as well as gum disease. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to establish whether a cause-and-effect relationship exists and to determine if, or how, treating gum disease may affect your overall health.
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    Studies indicate that severe gum disease may be associated with several other health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes or stroke. However, saying that two conditions are associated is not the same as saying that one causes the other. It only means that some studies have shown that more people with gum disease experience one of the conditions mentioned above than people without gum disease. This finding could be the result of another factor, like smoking. For example, people who smoke are at higher risk for heart disease, stroke and cancer as well as gum disease. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to establish whether a cause-and-effect relationship exists and to determine if, or how, treating gum disease may affect your overall health.
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    Dentists can discover bone loss in routine dental X-rays, but the disease should be confirmed by a physician. Typical X-rays can only detect osteoporosis when 25% to 40% of bone loss has occurred. A bone density screening test called dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most commonly used to confirm the diagnosis.

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    Low calcium levels are uncommon in women, but when it happens, calcium deficiency may be related to inflammation of gum tissue surrounding the teeth. Nursing mothers, menopausal women, women who are very athletic, and women with lactose intolerance may be at risk of  not getting enough calcium in their diets. Low calcium can also cause muscle cramps, fatigue, lack of appetite, abnormal heart rhythms, and numbness in the extremities. Be sure to get enough calcium in your diet and/or with supplements, but don't overdo it. The US Office of Dietary Supplements recommends that women take no more than 2,500 mg of calcium a day.

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    Research suggests that young women who experience changes in the hormones estrogen and progesterone may experience changes in their gums. This is especially true during puberty when these hormones are fluctuating. During puberty, young women may experience gum inflammation. As long as you are brushing, flossing, and visiting your dentist routinely, you may not have any higher risk of developing periodontal disease. Over time, you may find that the irritation and inflammation decreases as your body adjusts to these hormonal changes. Symptoms may return to some degree during your period.

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    The answer is yes, however the risk is low. If you are taking antiresorptive agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, you typically do not need to avoid or postpone dental treatment. The risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw is very low. However, 10 percent of people with ONJ are taking these medications for treatment of osteoporosis. It may be beneficial for anyone who will be starting osteoporosis treatment with antiresorptive agents to see their dentist before beginning treatment or shortly after. This way, you and your dentist can ensure that you have good oral health going into treatment and develop a plan that will keep your mouth healthy during treatment.
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    It is very unlikely that infertility treatment itself affects a man or woman's oral health. There is, however, the possibility that oral health affects a woman's fertility. One study showed that women with more gum disease (gingivitis) took a longer time to get pregnant than those without gum disease. While this study only showed a relationship, not causation, it is thought that the inflammation from gum disease leads to a host of medical problems, with infertility just the latest to be correlated.
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    Birth control pills, or oral contraceptives, may increase inflammation of the gums. Past research, however, measured oral contraceptives that used much higher hormone doses, so it is possible that today's oral contraceptives may not have as much effect.

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    A , Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics, answered
    Those who may be a good candidate for orthognathic surgery usually have misaligned jaws, bite problems, and their face may be off balance. Due to these problems with the jaw, they may have difficulty eating, as well as speaking. But the re-shaping of the face through the orthognathic surgery can address all these issues at the same time. It even reaches people on a deeper level, giving them the confidence and comfort of which they have most likely always fell short.
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    Oral health touches every aspect of our lives but is often taken for granted. Your mouth is a window into the health of your body. It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies or general infection. Systemic diseases, those that affect the entire body, may first become apparent because of mouth lesions or other oral problems.

    Whether you are 80 or 8, your oral health is important. Be sure to practice good oral health by brushing twice a day, flossing once a day, eating a balanced diet and seeing your dentist regularly.
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