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What part of the brain is overly active during a migraine?

Dawn Marcus
Neurology
The back part of the brain is called the occipital lobe. Occipital comes from the Latin words ob (against) and capit (head). This part of the brain controls vision. Research shows that the occipital lobe is more active or hyperexcitable in people with migraine. The threshold for activation of migraine is lower in these individuals. Changes in the occipital lobe are often the first changes seen during migraine, so correcting this hyperexcitability may be a way to help raise a person's headache threshold and reduce headache susceptibility.
The Woman's Migraine Toolkit: Managing Your Headaches from Puberty to Menopause (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

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The Woman's Migraine Toolkit: Managing Your Headaches from Puberty to Menopause (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

Migraines are a common, controllable type of headache that affects one in every six women, more than 20 million in the United States alone. The Woman’s Migraine Toolkit helps readers take charge of...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.