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Do feverfew supplements help with migraine headache prevention?

Dawn Marcus
Neurology
Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) comes from a flower that looks like a daisy. Its main active ingredient is parthenolide. Feverfew reduces inflammation and -- as its name suggests -- it is commonly used to treat fevers, arthritis, menstrual discomfort, and migraines. Migraine frequency decreases by one-fourth in some people taking about 100 mg of feverfew daily. Parthenolide content varies widely among different brands of feverfew, and a preparation must contain at least 0.2 percent parthenolide to prevent migraines. A higher amount of parthenolide (0.5 percent) is available in feverfew manufactured in Israel (available at Galilee Herbal Remedies). This higher concentration may be more beneficial for reducing migraines. Feverfew decreases clotting and should be avoided if you have a bleeding disorders or use aspirin, anti-inflammatory medications, or other medications that decrease clotting.
The Woman's Migraine Toolkit: Managing Your Headaches from Puberty to Menopause (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

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The Woman's Migraine Toolkit: Managing Your Headaches from Puberty to Menopause (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

Migraines are a common, controllable type of headache that affects one in every six women, more than 20 million in the United States alone. The Woman’s Migraine Toolkit helps readers take charge of...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.