Mental Health

Mental Health

How well you cope with life - your mental health - is just as important as your physical health. Worry, stress, anxiety affects everyone, but if it overwhelms your ability to cope, make good decisions, and have fulfilling relationships, you need help. Counseling, medications, and supportive friends can help strengthen your ability to cope - and improve your mental health.

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    Specific treatment for children with conduct disorders will be determined by your child's (adolescent's) physician based on:

    • your child's (adolescent's) age, overall health, and medical history
    • extent of your child's (adolescent's) symptoms
    • your child's (adolescent's) tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies
    • expectations for the course of the condition
    • your opinion or preference

    Treatment may include:

    • Cognitive-behavioral approaches - The goal of cognitive-behavioral therapy is to improve problem solving skills, communication skills, impulse control, and anger management skills.
    • Family therapy - Family therapy is often focused on making changes within the family system, such as improving communication skills and family interactions.
    • Peer group therapy - Peer group therapy is often focused on developing social skills and interpersonal skills.
    • Medication

    While not considered effective in treating conduct disorder, medication may be used if other symptoms or disorders are present and responsive to medication.

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    A , Health Education, answered

    These days, happiness has been reduced to instant gratification. It should be mine by right, mine simply because I’m alive. And yet a quiet voice within us keeps whispering that in getting things and getting recognition we are not going to become happy. But the voice is drowned in the cacophony of our culture, commanding, ordering us to be happy. When we make happiness itself our goal, we are traveling down another dead end. Happiness will always stay ahead of us, out of reach. We are like the child who wants to camp out on the horizon, but the more he hikes toward it, the more it recedes. Eventually, he lies down and weeps in frustration, surrounded by mountain glories he never notices. Although we think of happiness as something to pursue, the original perception of that pursuit saw happiness as something that ensues -- not as the goal, but as the consequence of having achieved the goals of compassion and understanding, of reaching out to help others and finding peace within ourselves. Given these things, happiness will follow.

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    Some experts believe that a developmental sequence of experiences occurs in the development of conduct disorder. This sequence may start with ineffective parenting practices, followed by academic failure, and poor peer interactions. These experiences then often lead to depressed mood and involvement in a deviant peer group. Other experts, however, believe that many factors, including child abuse, genetic susceptibility, history of academic failure, brain damage, and/or a traumatic experience influence the expression of conduct disorder. Early detection and intervention into negative family and social experiences may be helpful in disrupting the development of the sequence of experiences that lead to more disruptive and aggressive behaviors.
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    Brainwashing is a severe form of social influence that causes changes in someone's way of thinking without that person's consent and often against his will. The "brainwasher" - that is, the influencing agent - actively breaks down the target's identity and replaces it with another set of behaviors, attitudes and beliefs that work in the target's current environment. So invasive is the influence that it requires the total isolation and dependency of the subject, which is why the most familiar brainwashing occurs in cults or prison camps.
    The agent requires complete control over the target, with sleep patterns, eating, using the bathroom and fulfillment of other basic human needs depending on the agent's will.
    Most psychologists believe that brainwashing is possible under the right conditions. Some, however, see it as improbable or at least as a less potent influence than the media portrays it. Many experts believe that even under ideal conditions, the effects of brainwashing are most often short-term. The victim's old identity, they say, is not eradicated but instead is in hiding, and once the "new identity" is no longer reinforced, the person's old attitudes and beliefs begin to return.
    During the Korean War, Korean and Chinese captors reportedly brainwashed American prisoners of war. Several POWs ultimately confessed to waging germ warfare -- which they hadn't -- and pledged allegiance to communism by the end of their captivity. About two dozen soldiers (a tiny fraction of the 20,000-plus prisoners in communist countries) refused to come back to the United States when they were set free.
    Some psychologists say the apparent conversion of those POWs was the result of plain-old torture, not "brainwashing." And the fact that so few were converted leads to a question of reliability: Is brainwashing a system that produces similar results across cultures and personality types, or does it hinge primarily on a particular target's susceptibility to influence?
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    There's a contrast between an underlying fear of brainwashing in modern society, as seen in films and literature, and the apparent belief of many citizens who sit on juries that brainwashing is hogwash, leading to criminal convictions for people like Patty Hearst and Lee Malvo who based their defense on claims of brainwashing.

    People seem to distinguish between brainwashing now and brainwashing in the future - it's the latter that's apparently more fearsome. The future of brainwashing, if Hollywood and conspiracy theorists are to be believed, involves more high-tech approaches that are a lot scarier than verbal or physical "assaults on identity." Combined with hypnosis techniques, a futuristic brain implant might be all that's needed to control a human's thoughts, actions and beliefs. But most scientists agree that the field of neurology is nowhere close to that level of understanding of the human brain.

    Additionally, many psychologists believe large-scale brainwashing -- for instance, by way of the mass media and subliminal messages -- is impossible, because the thought-reform process requires isolation and absolute dependence of the subject. It's just not that easy to change a person's core personality and belief system.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Schizoaffective disorder is a mental illness that has attributes from both schizophrenia and a mood disorder (typically depression or bipolar disorder). It affects women more than men, but is fairly rare, occurring in about 2 to 5 people out of 1,000.

    Symptoms of schizoaffective disorder can include those from depression, mania, and schizophrenia, which can make it difficult to function on a daily basis and maintain stable relationships with friends and family.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Symptoms of schizoaffective disorder can vary from person to person, especially since not everyone has the same mood disorder associated with their schizophrenia. The mood disorders typically associated with schizoaffective disorder are depression or bipolar disorder. You may experience some or all of the following symptoms:

    Symptoms of schizophrenia include not always being able to tell reality from fantasy, seeing and hearing things that are not real, feeling paranoid about a government plot against you, being extremely depressed and feeling void of emotions, and/or acting, speaking, and moving in odd ways (if at all).

    Depression is associated with feeling incredibly down and apathetic.

    Bipolar disorder is associated with periods of feeling depressed, but also periods of mania where you have lots of energy, speak a mile a minute, and feel like you can do a million tasks at once.
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    No one knows what causes schizoaffective disorder, but genetic factors appear to play a role. Some researchers think schizoaffective disorder is caused by an imbalance of serotonin or dopamine, chemicals that brain cells use to signal to each other. Other factors that contribute to development of the disorder might include exposure in the womb to viruses or toxins, and complications at birth.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Schizoaffective disorder is a hybrid mental illness of schizophrenia and a mood disorder like depression or bipolar disorder. As a result, it is common to see people experiencing symptoms of both schizophrenia and a mood disorder, like hallucinations, movement impairment, unusual behavior and speech, mania, and feelings of hopelessness and despair. In some people, these symptoms come and go in episodes, but in others they are always there. As a result, it can be difficult to perform daily activities, even simple ones like brushing your teeth, holding down a job, and maintaining relationships with family and friends.

    Luckily, schizoaffective disorder is treatable with medication and therapy or counseling. The medications will mitigate or completely eliminate your symptoms and the therapy sessions give you an opportunity for you to voice all your feelings and feel more connected, as well as discuss your concerns, worries, and struggles in life. It can also help you identify relapse warning signs and learn coping techniques.

    When people stick to their treatment plan like a piece of gum under their shoe, their symptoms are controlled well enough that they can function like a pro.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Treatment for schizoaffective disorder is similar to other mental illness treatment. This includes medicine and different forms of counseling.

    Medications used for schizoaffective disorder depend on which mood disorder is associated with the schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is typically treated with antipsychotic medications since they relieve the psychotic symptoms. Mood stabilizers and antidepressants are also common forms of treatment since they relieve the mood-related symptoms.

    Therapy can also help people with schizoaffective disorder. It is more likely to be helpful when combined with medication treatment. Therapy sessions give you an opportunity for you to voice your feelings and feel more connected, as well as discuss your concerns, worries, and struggles in life. It can also help you identify relapse warning signs and learn coping techniques.
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