Mental Health

Mental Health

How well you cope with life - your mental health - is just as important as your physical health. Worry, stress, anxiety affects everyone, but if it overwhelms your ability to cope, make good decisions, and have fulfilling relationships, you need help. Counseling, medications, and supportive friends can help strengthen your ability to cope - and improve your mental health.

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    Some people with severe mental illness may have impaired reasoning due to their condition. People with thinking difficulties or muddled thinking may misunderstand the motives of the actions of their family, friends or others. This may result in all kinds of difficulties and misunderstandings, even provoking the person to self harm. Problems of thinking (called cognitive problems) are generally not very responsive to medication.
    Family should keep communications simple and short and regularly express their regard for the person. Arguing about any misunderstandings may simply escalate difficulties.
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    In all the serious mental illnesses, social withdrawal can be a problem. Young people with schizophrenia isolate themselves in their bedrooms. People with depression tend to stay in bed a lot of the time. It is difficult to know exactly the reason for this but the complex surroundings of a normal life may be too much for the person who is dealing with a considerably active or traumatic inner life.
    Reach out carefully to the person despite their withdrawal. Forcing someone to join in with family life does not usually have the desired result. Gentle persuasion to be involved one on one with family members may be of benefit. It may also help to talk with the person about their withdrawal and show a genuine desire to understand. Ask questions and listen to the answers.
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    People with serious mental illness (SMI) often have feelings of hopelessness. Those with depression have seriously low moods that are difficult to change, even with medications and/or psychological therapy.
    Be tolerant, loving and encouraging, raise the person's spirits in some way to encourage feelings of self worth. Learning more about SMI is the key to understanding. Try to persuade other family and friends away from criticism and negative attitudes.
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    People with serious mental illness (SMI) may believe that they are a burden to their families through their illness or other factors in their lives. They may feel that their families or friends would be better off without them. They may describe themselves as bad people.
    If a family suspects that this is what their relative is feeling, efforts can be made to make the person feel valued as a good person, and wanted, needed and loved. Love, trust and sincerity are all important. Family education about mental illness often helps family caregivers to be less burdened, or to be more adept at managing, and coping with, the burden (if it is considered a burden) or stresses of caring.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Don't come to the rescue of someone else who is "being bullied" merely to come to their rescue. You may not know all of the details. Furthermore, your response is often more about you than it is them, and if you are not there to follow up to see what happens after you leave, it can often lead to the bully taking their frustrations out on this person when you are not around. We have to learn to teach "victims" to stand up for themselves and support them in the process.
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    It is recommended that we all take holidays from our electronic devices. Many people have trouble setting down their device for any period of time.

    Ideas for decreasing your distraction are:
    • Turn off your phone when you are at meals or out to restaurants.
    • Turn off your phone when engaged in quality time with family or friends so that you can focus on the present company and activity.
    • Put your phone away at social events so you will be more likely to socialize and enjoy the company of others.
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    A Psychiatry, answered on behalf of
    In treating vascular cognitive impairment, the most important thing is to take care of the person’s general health. Any known vascular disease, like a cardiac condition, high blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugars, must be managed. This is to prevent further cerebrovascular disease.

    If you can prevent damage, you can actually stop the progression of vascular cognitive impairment. It will not get any worse if you control some very straightforward things.
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    A Psychiatry, answered on behalf of
    The most common behavioral symptoms of vascular cognitive impairment are depression and agitation. Apathy mixed with irritability or an anxiety may also occur. In the worst-case scenarios, there will be psychotic symptoms and frontal symptoms of disinhibition.
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    Vascular cognitive impairment is also known as vascular dementia. This is caused by a stroke or series of small strokes, which result in ischemic or unperfused regions in the brain, which result in areas of the brain not getting enough blood flow. These areas become nonfunctional and result in impairment in one's ability to think, communicate and function. 
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    A , Psychiatry, answered
    Even before your therapy session begins, your therapist may have you fill out certain forms to assess your mood. One of the first things your therapist will do in the therapy session is to determine how you've been feeling this week, compared to other weeks. This is what we call a mood check. The therapist will ask you which problems you'd like to put on the agenda for that session and what happened during the previous week that was important. Then the therapist will make a bridge between the previous therapy session and this week's therapy session by asking you what seemed important that you discussed during the past session and what self-help assignments you were able to do during the week.

    Next, you and the therapist will discuss the problem or problems you put on the agenda and do a combination of problem-solving and assessing the accuracy of your thoughts and beliefs about that problematic situation. You will also learn new skills. You and the therapist will discuss how you can make the best use of what you've learned during the session in the coming week, summarize the important points of the session, and ask you for feedback: what was helpful about the session, what was not, anything that bothered you, anything you'd like to see changed. As you will see, both therapist and patient are quite active in this form of treatment.