Mental Health

Mental Health

How well you cope with life - your mental health - is just as important as your physical health. Worry, stress, anxiety affects everyone, but if it overwhelms your ability to cope, make good decisions, and have fulfilling relationships, you need help. Counseling, medications, and supportive friends can help strengthen your ability to cope - and improve your mental health.

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    Muscle dysmorphia should be managed according to the treatment prescribed by a doctor. This may include taking a medication or participating in therapy. If you're currently displaying the signs and symptoms of muscle dysmorphia but are not yet receiving treatment, take control of your condition by talking to a close friend or family member about your condition and get on the road to daily management and recovery.

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    Muscle dysmorphia is characterized by a distorted self-image, which can lead to damage to the body as the person strives to attain an imagined ideal body state. People with muscle dysmorphia are more likely to use steroids and other related drugs, which can damage the body in various ways in time. If you have muscle dysmorphia, you're also more likely to work out more than your body can actually handle, so you run the risk of straining or damaging your muscles, joints, cartilage, and other areas affected by weight lifting.
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    Working out excessively can put a great amount of strain on your body. People with muscle dysmorphia sometimes damage their muscles, joints, cartilage, and other related areas. They are also at heightened risk for drug and steroid abuse and the related health risks of those substances. When eating disorders and/or steroid abuse is present, people with muscle dysmorphia may also suffer from cardiovascular disease or kidney failure.
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    Schizoaffective disorder does run in families, although experts don't know exactly how schizoaffective is passed down through a family. Schizoaffective disorder, like schizophrenia, is partly caused by genes. You may know that your height, eye, and hair color are often similar to your close family members. Likewise, if your parent or sibling has schizoaffective disorder, you are more likely than the average person to have the illness too. However, experts believe that there are other causes of schizoaffective disorder, including environmental causes. Some scientists think that an infant's exposure to viruses or substances in the womb, a child's abnormal brain development, or complications during birth might cause the illness as well.
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    No one knows what causes schizoaffective disorder, but genetic factors appear to play a role. Some researchers think schizoaffective disorder is caused by an imbalance of serotonin or dopamine, chemicals that brain cells use to signal to each other. Other factors that contribute to development of the disorder might include exposure in the womb to viruses or toxins, and complications at birth.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Schizoaffective disorder is a mental illness that has attributes from both schizophrenia and a mood disorder (typically depression or bipolar disorder). It affects women more than men, but is fairly rare, occurring in about 2 to 5 people out of 1,000.

    Symptoms of schizoaffective disorder can include those from depression, mania, and schizophrenia, which can make it difficult to function on a daily basis and maintain stable relationships with friends and family.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Symptoms of schizoaffective disorder can vary from person to person, especially since not everyone has the same mood disorder associated with their schizophrenia. The mood disorders typically associated with schizoaffective disorder are depression or bipolar disorder. You may experience some or all of the following symptoms:

    Symptoms of schizophrenia include not always being able to tell reality from fantasy, seeing and hearing things that are not real, feeling paranoid about a government plot against you, being extremely depressed and feeling void of emotions, and/or acting, speaking, and moving in odd ways (if at all).

    Depression is associated with feeling incredibly down and apathetic.

    Bipolar disorder is associated with periods of feeling depressed, but also periods of mania where you have lots of energy, speak a mile a minute, and feel like you can do a million tasks at once.
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    Muscle dysmorphia has no specific physical cause, and any underlying physical or genetic cause that may be present is also typically heavily linked to psychological and social factors. People may develop muscle dysmorphia because they feel pressure to become more muscular, or because they are insecure about their body image. There is also evidence that some people have a genetic predisposition to the condition. While all of these things can influence the development of muscle dysmorphia, they do not necessarily always cause or intensify the condition.

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    Muscle dysmorphia can develop in anyone of any age. But the onset of body dysmorphia, with which muscle dysmorphia is often associated, typically occurs during adolescence. Some research suggests that children of increasingly young age are showing signs of muscle dysmorphia, so there is reason to believe that this condition will become a growing concern for children and their parents.

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    Men and boys are at much higher risk for muscle dysmorphia than girls and women, as the condition almost always occurs in males. People who think they are small or weak have increased risk, as do people who have low self-esteem. There has also been research to suggest that certain genes can increase a person's risk for developing muscle dysmorphia.