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Do people with body dysmorphic disorder see things differently?

Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, conducted research that reveals that people with body dysmorphic disorder may process visual information differently than those without it.

In the study, people with and without BDD were shown three different images of faces in regular, high and low resolutions. Results from MRIs showed participants with BDD used the analytical side of their brains to process all three images, while the other participants used that side of their brains only for the high resolution image.

This may mean that the minds of people with BDD seek to acutely process visual details, even when there aren't any visual details to process. This may explain why they see flaws in themselves, even when those flaws might not be there.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.